Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Unemployment benefits

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    227

    Default Unemployment benefits

    Sponsors
    In the unemployment benefit guide, it says that in order to claim unemployment benefits one has to have lived continously in New Zealand for at least 2 years. Also one has to have a permanent residency. Not sure if the residency one has during the first two years is permanent or not. It says resident visa on the passport but I guess it isn't permanent unless one has already stayed two years here. Please correct me if I am wrong.
    Last edited by kramvi; 25th December 2012 at 03:54 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    386

    Default

    I think it is more a condition of claiming UB. There are some options but for dire circumstances only.

    Residency wise, you do need to satisfy the minimum stay criteria during the first two years. Subsequently that will not be necessary provided you apply for the next stage.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    21,416

    Default

    Not sure if the residency one has during the first two years is permanent or not.
    Yes, it's permanent, within NZ. It's travel conditions that expire after two years, so the Residence could lapse if you were outside NZ at that point.

    Remember, the application form requires everyone to state that they have the means to support themself (and their family, if applicable) for two years, in the event that they don't find work, or aren't applying with a job or offer. As far as the NZ government is concerned, a Skilled Migrant is coming to contribute to NZ society, not to take from it.

    After two years spent in NZ, after having activated the Residence visa, a person could claim unemployment benefit, subject to conditions. I believe there are benefits available before that, for instance, if children are in dire need, but they're for extreme circumstances only, and means tested.

    This page and its links may be of use, http://www.cab.org.nz/vat/money/ben/...formation.aspx, and this is the government site. http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/ind...t-benefit.html

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JandM View Post
    Yes, it's permanent, within NZ. It's travel conditions that expire after two years, so the Residence could lapse if you were outside NZ at that point.

    Remember, the application form requires everyone to state that they have the means to support themself (and their family, if applicable) for two years, in the event that they don't find work, or aren't applying with a job or offer. As far as the NZ government is concerned, a Skilled Migrant is coming to contribute to NZ society, not to take from it.

    After two years spent in NZ, after having activated the Residence visa, a person could claim unemployment benefit, subject to conditions. I believe there are benefits available before that, for instance, if children are in dire need, but they're for extreme circumstances only, and means tested.

    This page and its links may be of use. http://www.cab.org.nz/vat/money/ben/...formation.aspx

    So I gather that even during the first two years, after completing one's requirements of 49 section, one is still a permanent resident. However to claim UB one has have to have been in New Zealand for 184 days each year for the first two years and applied for travel condition to be removed.

    It's a pity why it is only one's stay in NZ that UB are based on and not the amount of time one has worked in one's field. One could have stayed all that period in NZ and not worked a single day.

    However I guess the amount of UB that a person gets will be based on how much one worked (like in the US) and not a fixed amount for everybody. Any idea how the UBs here are calculated?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    21,416

    Default

    However to claim UB one has have to have been in New Zealand for 184 days each year for the first two years and applied for travel condition to be removed.
    No, it doesn't say that. You have to have been a resident, living in NZ, for two years - that's it - and fulfil the other criteria on that government site linked to above. The other stuff about 184 days, etc., is to do with Immigration NZ, which you've moved on from, and is nothing to do with other NZ government departments.

    It's a pity why it is only one's stay in NZ that UB are based on
    That's not correct. Being in NZ for two years is just the qualifying gateway. After that, you're assessed on the same basis as everyone else who's a resident or citizen of NZ.

    You ask how the benefit is calculated. Do please READ the links given you already.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JandM View Post
    No, it doesn't say that. You have to have been a resident, living in NZ, for two years - that's it - and fulfil the other criteria on that government site linked to above. The other stuff about 184 days, etc., is to do with Immigration NZ, which you've moved on from, and is nothing to do with other NZ government departments.

    That's not correct. Being in NZ for two years is just the qualifying gateway. After that, you're assessed on the same basis as everyone else who's a resident or citizen of NZ.

    You ask how the benefit is calculated. Do please READ the links given you already.

    Wow JandM you must be so very dedicated to this site. How was your christmas?

    Yes I missed the link you sent me. I am going to read it now.

    Anyway so let me get this straight. So if a person lives only 184 days for the first two years, it doesn't mean that one has been living in NZ for two years. And so one will not qualify for the UB. Am I right?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dairy Flat, Auckland
    Posts
    1,633

    Default

    Merry Christmas Kramvi

    All this information can be found in the links JandM gave you but in case you missed it here it is
    Ordinarily Resident

    Ordinarily resident means someone who is normally and lawfully in New Zealand and intends to stay here, someone that considers New Zealand to be their home. In deciding if someone is ordinarily resident we look at:

    • your intentions towards New Zealand including your reasons for periods of absence and return
    • the length of time you spend in New Zealand on a continual basis
    • property and asset ownership. Do you own a home or any other large assets in New Zealand?
    • the location of your cash assets: investments and bank accounts
    • whether your income is earned in New Zealand or overseas
    • whether you pay taxes in New Zealand
    • whether you still vote in or are still eligible to vote in New Zealand general elections
    • your commitment to New Zealand such as involvement in the community, clubs or other
    • groups.

    All of these factors are considered in relation to each individual’s circumstances. More information may be requested or more questions asked in order to be able to consider each of these points.
    Generally, if you leave New Zealand for more than 26 weeks you may not be considered ordinarily resident in New Zealand. If you spend more time outside of New Zealand than inside you are also not considered to be ordinarily resident in New Zealand.
    Please note: a person cannot be ordinarily resident in two places at the same time.

    http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/ind...-pensions.html

    If you are still not certain then its best to contact work and income and ask them as each case is taken on its own merits. You will need to contact them anyway if you are intending to make a claim.
    http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/about-work-and-income/contact-us/#general


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    386

    Default

    UB is calculated (if you are asking for the way the amount is calculated) based on your residency status, marital status, whether you have children or dependents, income, assets, partner's status, income, assets, monetary pressures (such as divorced and children's child care etc), whether you seem able and willing to look for work, whether you can prove you are interested in employment, whether you are under 14, under 16, under 18, under 19 or over senior citizen age, or in the age range 20-senior.

    I don't think this will help you in what you actually are asking. This belongs to the domain of a case manager and you have to go to a W&I office after making an appointment. Please ensure you have all bank and academic records, and all other details when you go there, but they will tell you what to bring, anyway.

    The process is to run you through elimination criteria which there are so many that this is not something you can understand over online posts.

    The basic message is that unlike my home country India, the government does have a system to protect you should you end up on the street, they have conditions and a good system to ensure you really need it. I find it to be a very fair system (especially because I did not see this when I grew up back home) and no it is not just based on residency. There are exceptions but generally residency is an elimination criteria if you are not in dire circumstances. Keep them informed and you will see that they care.

    There is a specific law which is why you have a Minister for Social Development. And no it is not for the purpose of residency but a security blanket should (god forbid) you end up somewhere not very nice. I have been there earlier in my life (before I came to NZ). I do appreciate it as a result.

    Don't worry so much, just ask W&I. This is a country where I find the government organizational structure is approachable and fair and honest. It does mean you need to be well prepared with your facts.

    I hope this helps. This is just my personal opinion.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Caroline and Dave View Post
    Merry Christmas Kramvi

    All this information can be found in the links JandM gave you but in case you missed it here it is
    Ordinarily Resident

    Ordinarily resident means someone who is normally and lawfully in New Zealand and intends to stay here, someone that considers New Zealand to be their home. In deciding if someone is ordinarily resident we look at:

    • your intentions towards New Zealand including your reasons for periods of absence and return
    • the length of time you spend in New Zealand on a continual basis
    • property and asset ownership. Do you own a home or any other large assets in New Zealand?
    • the location of your cash assets: investments and bank accounts
    • whether your income is earned in New Zealand or overseas
    • whether you pay taxes in New Zealand
    • whether you still vote in or are still eligible to vote in New Zealand general elections
    • your commitment to New Zealand such as involvement in the community, clubs or other
    • groups.

    All of these factors are considered in relation to each individual’s circumstances. More information may be requested or more questions asked in order to be able to consider each of these points.
    Generally, if you leave New Zealand for more than 26 weeks you may not be considered ordinarily resident in New Zealand. If you spend more time outside of New Zealand than inside you are also not considered to be ordinarily resident in New Zealand.
    Please note: a person cannot be ordinarily resident in two places at the same time.

    http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/ind...-pensions.html

    If you are still not certain then its best to contact work and income and ask them as each case is taken on its own merits. You will need to contact them anyway if you are intending to make a claim.
    http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/about-work-and-income/contact-us/#general

    Thanks so much Caroline and Dave on what an ordinarily resident is. However to claim UB benefits I think I can safely conclude that one has to have LIVED in NZ for two years and not be just an ordinarily resident. Hope I am correct.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    386

    Default

    Sponsors
    I think you are asking the same question again (or maybe asking for confirmation of you understanding), why don't you ask W&I? I feel I detect some anxiety in repeated attempts to clarify it? Any specific concerns?

    In any case the rules will automatically decide whether you can or can't get it. Once you find out, the matter is done.

    Are you in an unemployable situation? Also Study Link is integrated into W&I so they take any student loans or current course commitments into consideration. This system helps you get to work, not just decide on monetary support. There are many things such as training seminars, job search seminars, CV writing assistance etc, I suggest that it not be taken merely as a commercial or financial assistance system. It is there to help you, do try it out.

Similar Threads

  1. safeguarding yourself against unemployment?
    By Mgee in forum Money Matters
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11th March 2010, 09:52 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •