Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Benefits of residency?

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Parnell, Auckland
    Posts
    42

    Default Benefits of residency?

    Hello. I have been reading this forum for a while as we are moving to New Zealand early next year. My wife's entire research group is moving and I am fortunate to have a portable job. We also have a 3 y/o son.

    My question is whether to apply for residency as a Skilled Migrant (I believe we would qualify) for $3100 (including EOI fee, Resident application fee and Migrant Levy fee) or for a Work Visa (free!).

    We are coming to New Zealand for 2.5 years for sure; but after that her contract will expire and we will see. We visited NZ in 1999 for 3 weeks and loved it, but I am not sure we can leave our family and work behind in the USA permanently.

    One tempting idea is to apply for residency, and after the two years obtain an IRRV allowing us to return to work/live or for our son to study there at some point in the future - if I understand the IRRV correctly?

    Are there any other benefits to residency other than Kiwi pride? For instance, a work permit of 2 years+ seems to get you access to health care. Otherwise, we will probably come under the work-to-residence visa and then decide later about applying for residence if we stay.

    Finally, if you get an IRRV and your passport expires, does the IRRV carry over to the new passport? Or if you have not been back in 3,5 or 8+ years do they call it null and void.

    Thank you very much in advance, I appreciate your thoughts.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Wellington, originally USA
    Posts
    915

    Default

    You can have your IRRV put in your new passport too. My understanding is that they are forever, but that being said, I thought I read something about the NZ government basically calling all IRRV null and void if you weren't in the country for several years- this happened sometime in the 70's? I thought. Basically, the governments do change and have different views of immigration. If you stay the 5 years and get citizenship I think you would feel totally safe being able to return at any point in the future, but there may be tax consquences to that as well.

    I'd say go over on your work visa, see how you like it. Applying for PR from inside the country is actually cheaper. And if you find you don't like the damp houses or living far from family you've saved yourself a bundle. If you find you love the beauty and the fact that you can go shopping with bare feet- then you can apply and slam dunk the points because you will already be working there.

    best of luck!

    forgot to say- Welcome!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wellington NZ
    Posts
    239

    Default

    I'm with tigerlily.

    From a cost perspective, it does depend on how much you'd end up paying for associated medicals. If you get a work permit and apply for residency later, you end up paying for essentially the same tests twice in a short period of time. That factor alone made PR the more attractive option, despite the higher fee. Looks like fees have changed substantially since then.

    I also figured that PR would be a better sell to potential employers. I'm not sure that's true and in any event is not relevant to your family's decision.

    Once you get an IRRV, it can be transferred to new US passports multiple times with the payment of a minor fee. If your passports are getting long in the tooth, that might be your excuse to renew early, before coming to NZ.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Parnell, Auckland
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Thank you Tigerlily and BarryP.

    Do you know about differences in schooling for residents?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by BlueDevil; 4th September 2007 at 01:57 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Essex, UK
    Posts
    253

    Default

    Best of luck - can't help with your query but wondered how your user name originated - don't suppose you are from Concord, Cali?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    189

    Default

    free schooling for residents and I think international student fees for everyone else. expensive, I believe, even for primary school. however, your son can start school anytime between his 5th and 6th birthday and so you may be going back home before he starts school.

    k

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    490

    Default

    University fees are significantly less for permanant residents as are health care costs (office visits and prescription meds). You're able to vote as well. Mortagages easier to access.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Greenmeadows, napier
    Posts
    27

    Red face Work visa vs PR

    With PR you can also claim family assistance allowance - (depending on the level of your income) this is not possible on working visa's ! ....Neil

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Beautiful Raumati Beach
    Posts
    138

    Default

    We have been on work visas for nearly 2 years and are awaiting residency .
    The advantages for us of residency will be;

    Cheaper university fees (By far!)
    Family allowance entitlement (for us about $100 pw)
    Entitlement to vote

    That is all as far as I know, primary and secondary schooling is still free on work visas and we have had no problem getting a mortgage or credit card.

    Good luck!

    Denise

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Parnell, Auckland
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Paul - BlueDevil refers to Duke University.

    denisesykes - What is the Family Allowance Entitlement? Is it income-sensitive/dependent?

    Thanks all.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •