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Thread: Taking oil, brake fluid etc in shipping container

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    89

    Default Taking oil, brake fluid etc in shipping container

    I have a couple of mountain bikes which have hydraulic disc brakes and suspension forks, and I do most of my own servicing so I have bottles of brake fluid and suspension oil - anyone know if I can take these in the container? John Mason have given us paperwork that says no flammable or caustic liquids, no aerosols... now the brake fluid is definitely caustic (well, the DOT stuff is, the mineral oil is fairly inert), but I have things like WD-40 and lubricants in aerosols, as well as a bottle of isopropyl alcohol (for cleaning the brake discs)... I can't find anything about this type of item on the MAF biosecurity web pages. Any ideas?

    Cheers,

    Will

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    4,455

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will_2007 View Post
    I have a couple of mountain bikes which have hydraulic disc brakes and suspension forks, and I do most of my own servicing so I have bottles of brake fluid and suspension oil - anyone know if I can take these in the container? John Mason have given us paperwork that says no flammable or caustic liquids, no aerosols... now the brake fluid is definitely caustic (well, the DOT stuff is, the mineral oil is fairly inert), but I have things like WD-40 and lubricants in aerosols, as well as a bottle of isopropyl alcohol (for cleaning the brake discs)... I can't find anything about this type of item on the MAF biosecurity web pages. Any ideas?

    Cheers,

    Will
    Sorry can't really answer your question, maybe you could send an email to MAF / Customs to ask them for sure.

    If it were me, I would have no problem bringing the WD-40 (but it is readily available in NZ anyway). I wouldn't bring anything caustic incase of accidents as it could potentially ruin your belongings.

    I will say that I would think long and hard about bringing the isopropyl alcohol as it is a restricted item in NZ due to its use in the manufacturing of drugs. It is possible to purchase small bottles of it in NZ so would say that if the size of the bottle is small it may be ok?

    Ian

  3. #3

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    I don't think it's so much a problem for MAF as for the shipping agent. We put some non-flammable/water-based paint into the container, and our shipping agent told us later that he had kept quiet about that in the Bill of Lading. And this was with non-flammable stuff, so I would imagine they're not keen on shipping flammables or caustic stuff. We left all stuff like WD40 out anyway.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Christchurch :)
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    211

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    The bikes will need to be inspected, and forget about bringing the break fluid as it will be ruined by the time they travelled here through the extreme conditions, you will have to do a full change on your bike when they arrive, like I had to do on my car.

    Didn't know about IPA being restricted, I brought 2L with me for my work.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    ChCh as of 06/11/2004
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    288

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asli&Mark View Post
    The bikes will need to be inspected, and forget about bringing the break fluid as it will be ruined by the time they travelled here through the extreme conditions, you will have to do a full change on your bike when they arrive, like I had to do on my car.
    Which particular extreme condition would affect the brake fluid in your car? It is a sealed system so moisture shouldn't get in and the boiling point of brake fluid is over 200 deg C so I think I would be worried about a lot of other things being damaged if the container got that hot!

    The brakes on my car were fine when it arrived in NZ and that was after 3 months in a container including having been forgotten about on the dock in Singapore for a month. It was even there during the Sunami.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Christchurch :)
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    I know most don't but as the fluid should be changed ever 12 to 18 months, depending on the conditions it's used in (if it's the new silicon type there's no problems). So after traveling through the extremes of temperature and humidity personally I wouldn't be risking it, expensive experience has taught me.
    Mine is not a sealed system, the only 100% sealed one I know of it the pressurised suspension system on the citroens.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    89

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    Cheers guys, I might just give what I have to friends and buy new when I get there... slightly annoying but would save any hassle and possible leaks in transit.

    Will

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    227

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asli&Mark View Post
    IMine is not a sealed system, the only 100% sealed one I know of it the pressurised suspension system on the citroens.
    Sorry how are citroens anymore sealed? They have a vent hose directly into the top of the reservoir. The way I see it its less sealed than a reservoir sitting on top of a master cylinder,that is only a header of fluid sealed with a plastic cap.
    Is the LHM in Citroens even hydroscopic ? Iím not sure.

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