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Thread: NZ drowning stats- 41 this yr so far!!!

  1. #1
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    Default NZ drowning stats- 41 this yr so far!!!

    and only 25% of Kiwi kids age 12 can swim 200m.

    I love swimming- I taught both my kids to swim and have decided to go for it and get the AustSwim while here because having read the stats I think NZ needs all the swim teachers (and teachers who can teach swimming) they can get!

    Why do you think these statistics are so depressing?

  2. #2
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    Oh dear- that doesn't read right! I meant why are the stats so dire/awful, not questioning whether they are awful, iyswim.

  3. #3
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    only 25% of Kiwi kids age 12 can swim 200m
    I'm amazed to hear this - my Kiwi grandchildren can do this already, having started learning before their first birthdays, as had their older cousins also in NZ, and I'd assumed that this was part of the general culture. It really needs to be, given the easy access to beaches and all the water sports available. Go for it!

  4. #4
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    That makes me sad....for us, living on an island already (we live on Vancouver Island in Canada), swimming was a MUST. We're always near water in some capacity. And when we get there, it will continue.

  5. #5
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    I think historically most kids accessed swimming through their schools and now not so many schools have swimming pools - thankfully my son's school does Sadly the stats on child drownings make pretty dire reading too

    Karenx

  6. #6
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    My daughter's school has to build a new classroom and the school is (this amazes me, I'm not used to this kind of consultation) asking parents where they should put it! There are 4 possibilities, but one of them involves demolishing the swimming pool. In term 1, every child from year 2 and on is chucked in for about 30 minutes, 4 days a week. My daughter's swimming improved fantastically over that term! The classes she goes to at the council-run pools have changed tack recently. They're not concentrating on learning the different strokes, they're concentrating a lot more on survival, making them stronger swimmers, even if their technique isn't the best. Fantastic idea, one which I wholeheartedly condone. Now to hope they don't tear down the pool, there aren't many schools around here that still have pools, I think they're vital!

    41 is 41 too many, extremely sad statistics.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kanga View Post
    and only 25% of Kiwi kids age 12 can swim 200m.

    I love swimming- I taught both my kids to swim and have decided to go for it and get the AustSwim while here because having read the stats I think NZ needs all the swim teachers (and teachers who can teach swimming) they can get!

    Why do you think these statistics are so depressing?
    The statistics I can find state "In 2008, just one in five 10-year-olds can swim 200m" which is actually even worse.

    For anyone interested this is the Annual Drowning Report 2008 (pdf) for NZ.

    A couple of other facts:-

    Average of 14 deaths per year from swimming.
    Only Canada and New Zealand have more adults drowning than children.

    Ian

  8. #8

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    I feel saddened by the numbers. Coming from an Island country myself (England) I have always thought it extremely important that everyone should swim, so I put into practice what I believe; my son is 6 months old now, and I've been taking him swimming weekly since he was 4 1/2 months.

    OK so right now I'm just giving him water confidence, but as he matures I'll teach him to swim strongly. I really do believe that this is one of lifes essentials that must start at home, and not just left to school to teach.

    Just my $0.02.

    Rod

  9. #9
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    All the drownings that I have heard about on the news this year would not have been changed by people being stronger swimmers. They seem to be more down to circumstances such as storms at sea, fishermen swept off rock whilst fishing, rip tides, or very young children accidentally getting into pool areas. I'm not sure it's just down to children and adults being poor swimmers.

  10. #10
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    41 to many if they could have been prevented.

    Learning to swim (at any age) is extremely important and a great way of keeping fit - he says sat on a sofa, on a diet, thinking about doing some exercise but never getting around to it.

    Kids should do as much as possible in school with their friends and yes I agree I'm with M-Squared that its a great idea to learn to survive and leave stroke technique until later - although improved stroke technique can make swimming a lot more efficient and therefore easier.

    Alan

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