Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 54

Thread: Firewood / Woodburning Tips

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Thanks for all the tips, we are hoping to be in NZ by next winter and have had wodburners in the UK for years so looking forward to having similar when we arrive. I have always gone for hard woods mainly ash as it splits easily and burns well, is there an equivalent in NZ or is it just softwood?
    Thanks
    Chris

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Inland Canterbury, NZ
    Posts
    8,390

    Default

    Around these parts (Canterbury) the woods you are most likely to get are a radiata pine, old man pine (a 30+ yr old pine, burns better than younger pine), macrocarpa (burns longer and hotter than pine), blue gum (best burn time and heat, nice coals) and sometimes beech (not quite as good as gum).

    We've also just got a load of Oregon Pine (which I think is Douglas Fir) which seems to us to burn a wee bit hotter and longer than old man pine.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Arrived Christchurch 6 November 2004!!
    Posts
    677

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Moorf View Post



    3. Top down is, imho, the easiest and fastest way to start a fire. I was skeptical until I tried it and now it's the only way we do it... easy peasy.
    Would that be your top down Moorf??


    Quote Originally Posted by Moorf View Post
    7. The easiest and cheapest way to keep your woodburner glass clean is to use the cold grey ashes on a piece of dampened tissue - dip damp tissue in the ashes in the firebox and rub glass with it - wipe off - voila!
    Just dry newspaper works wonders too!!

    Tanya

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Inland Canterbury, NZ
    Posts
    8,390

    Default

    LOL - that's really not a nice image

    So, anyone tried top down yet? It's amazing!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    288

    Default

    I might if I knew what you meant with top down? (I kinda had the same mental image as tanya)
    We've changed our open fire to an insert woodburner which isn't nearly as much fun but less draughty, way more efficient and much easier to light.
    I save wine corks as they're great fire starters BTW, a couple of sheets of newspaper, a cork and some kindling in a teepee (sp) shape seems to do the trick most days. All the same please explain the top down approach

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Inland Canterbury, NZ
    Posts
    8,390

    Default

    We've changed our open fire to an insert woodburner which isn't nearly as much fun but less draughty, way more efficient and much easier to light.
    Snap!

    Right, top down fire.. I'll see if I can explain it well enough... now I know you'll be thinking "that won't work" .. but it does!

    1. Fill bottom of firebox with your logs.

    2. Take five sheets of newspaper - roll each one diagonally into tube and tie a knot in it.

    3. Put the newspaper knots on top of the logs.

    4. Put your kindling on top of the newspaper.

    5. Light newspaper in two places - one each side.

    6. Shut door.

    7. Watch in amazement.

    And no, you don't need firelighters!

    The beauty behind this fire is it is self starting and you don't need to load logs on after lighting etc as the logs at the bottom will burn very well leaving you with nice hot bed to load up again - that's because it's getting the firebox and flue to a hot temp v. quickly - the best way to start a fire.

    Let me know how you get on - I've not known it to fail yet...
    Last edited by Moorf; 7th June 2009 at 08:43 PM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Arrived Christchurch 6 November 2004!!
    Posts
    677

    Default

    Found this on a woodburner website - slightly different to yours with the kindling Moorf?

    2. Top-down. While this method takes a little getting used to, it is absolutely reliable, and when it is done properly there is almost no smoke right from the start. Just place three or four full-sized split logs on the firebox floor or on the ground. Place several pieces of medium kindling across them and then maybe another layer of smaller pieces at right angles to those. Then put 10 or so pieces of fine kindling on top. Now take four or five full sheets of newspaper and roll each one up corner-to-corner and tie a sloppy knot in it. Knotting the paper helps to keep it from rolling around as it burns. Place the knots on top of the fine kindling. Light the paper and watch as the fire burns down through the light kindling, the heavy kindling and into the bottom logs. Using the top-down method, you can light the paper and watch the fire burn on its own for up to two hours.

    Tanya

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    288

    Default

    OK, I'll try that tomorrow! Thanks.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Inland Canterbury, NZ
    Posts
    8,390

    Default

    Hah! That's how Woz does his - we've had some great 'discussions' on the topic but both work equally well

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Canterbury to UK
    Posts
    2,755

    Default

    Anybody tried lighting one with Cabbage tree leaves? I'm told they make good kindling and I've a fair pile now

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •