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Thread: kids traveling with just one parent

  1. #11

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    Presumably if it was a requirement, it would have to be some sort of official letter from a solicitor etc? If someone is determined enough to take their children out of the country against the other parent's permission, surely they'd be determined enough to write a letter themselves pretending it's from the other parent?

  2. #12
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    Mar 2008
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    Alaska --> Hawkes Bay
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    Interesting!

    I worked for an airline about 12 years ago and I would have been fired immediately if I let a kid out of the country without both parents present and/or documentation of permission. and yes, bluesky, it would have had to have been a notarized letter of consent. I wonder if regulations have changed or if it was just the policy of the airline I worked for?? Are all of you ex-Brits? Maybe it is a US thing?

    I will be sure to check with the airline when we book, but your experiences are reassuring. I was imagining getting stuck at the airport all packed up and no home to return to and OH on the other side of the globe

    And thank you all for the good wishes on the interview. He's been advised to have a little nip of wine to take the edge off right before the interview-- he's out picking a good kiwi wine at the moment!

    Happy Thanksgiving! (for those of you so inclined to celebrate a north american holiday)

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Essex, UK
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GreenMeansGo View Post
    I worked for an airline about 12 years ago and I would have been fired immediately if I let a kid out of the country without both parents present and/or documentation of permission. and yes, bluesky, it would have had to have been a notarized letter of consent.
    Well as one of the people who was never asked, I would have been interested in finding out what they would have said if there is only one parent. How do you prove a negative?

    Ah well. Good luck anyway,

    Daniela

  4. #14
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    Sad off-topic aside: I wonder what would happen if an airline/border control was determined to find out the views of an absent parent, even if the parent who was there (or any other guardian/carer) was sadly adamant that the person in question was deceased? Are people in that situation expected to carry around a death certificate?

  5. #15
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    Christchurch from Scotland
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    I have friends who have both travelled without partner to Canada to visit relatives. Neither of them were allowed into the country before immigration had contacted their spouses to confirm that this was OK. The second time they took a letter signed by their spouses stating that the visit was authorised (not notarized, as one put it, she could have written it on the aircraft herself) but as she had a letter they were happy.

    I suppose if this happened upon landing in NZ your OH is likely to be in the airport to meet you anyway, so the problem would be solved easily. But if you can't get on the flight in the first place that is a problem. I would suggest in that instance that you are probabll better getting a letter to remove the worry.

  6. #16
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    I work for an airline (uk one) and have never been told to ask about the other parent when checking in children with only one parent present, I get that senario every day and has never seemed to cause any problems (if you check someone in and they in turn are not allowed entry to the country and returned to uk, they would notify the agent that had checked them in)
    hope that helps a little

  7. #17
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    well, I called Qantas and they said no problem... assuming we fly with them, sounds like we are ok. I might just get a letter anyway though, it wouldn't hurt just in case.

    Sophie and Daniela- that would be awful all around

    Kara, sounds like it might just be a north american thing, especially since international travel is not as common for most americans as it might be for european/uk folks. ?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    4,455

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    Not directly relevant but thought some might be interested in Preventing Children Being Taken from New Zealand.

    The CAPPS listing is interesting...
    If there is an order preventing removal, your child's details can be entered onto the Customs Service computer system for passengers (CAPPS Listing). This means that the child can actually be stopped from leaving New Zealand at the airport by customs officers when the details are checked on the customs system. This is especially important if your child has citizenship of more than one country, because the Court in New Zealand cannot prevent other countries from issuing a passport to your child.
    And a nice letter from your OH will have no effect i.e. no-one is allowed to take your child out of the country, not even yourself?

    Ian

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    BoP
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    187

    Default traveling with children

    My lawyer had my ex-wife just right a short statement that she had no problems of me flying to NZ with the girls and have it notarized. Never had to produce it actually.

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