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Thread: No Immigration for People W/ Chronic Illnesses?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    19

    Default No Immigration for People W/ Chronic Illnesses?

    Hi Everyone,

    I hope everyone is enjoying the beginning of spring or fall!

    I've got a question about medical conditions and immigration. I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis back in October. Will this automatically disqualify me? It is a condition that will need treatment for the rest of my life.

    Also, does this usually apply in other countries such as Canada or in the EU?

    Thanks everyone!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    36,907

    Default

    Here's the link to the conditions which are an automatic 'no' unless the person can get a medical waiver (and that's another point to consider). As you will see, in your case it is likely to depend on what treatment you are having.

    http://www.immigration.govt.nz/opsmanual/index.htm

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    617

    Default

    Appendix 10 to the Ops Manual is key. These illnesses automatically mean a waiver would be required.

    But also be aware that a lifetime cost of treatment expectation of NZ$25,000 would mean you do not have an Acceptable Standard of Health and would require a waiver. Obviously for a chronic condition (even if relatively benign) you could bump into that.

    That doesn't mean it can't be beat, but may require legal assistance or to get a waiver (based on net benefit to NZ), family in NZ, and a few other items

    Medical conditions from Appendix 10

    * HIV infection
    * Hepatitis B surface antigen positive, with abnormal liver function
    * Hepatitis C, RNA positive, with abnormal liver function
    * Malignancies of solid organs and haematopoietic tissue, including past history of, or currently under treatment

    Exceptions are:
    1. treated minor skin malignancies (not melanoma)
    2. malignancies where the interval since treatment is such that the probability of cure is > 90%, e.g.: early stage (I & IIA) breast cancer at 5 years; low risk prostate cancer at 5 years; early stage (Dukes A & B1) colorectal cancer at 5 years; childhood leukaemia at 5 years
    * Solid organ transplants, excluding corneal grafts more than 6 months old
    * Chronic renal failure or progressive renal disorders
    * Diseases or disorders such as osteoarthritis with a high probability of arthroplasty in the next four years
    * Central Nervous System disease, including motor neurone disease, complex partial seizures, poorly controlled epilepsy, prion disease, Alzheimer's and other dementia, and including paraplegia and quadriplegia
    * Cardiac disease including ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathy or valve disease requiring surgical and/or other procedural intervention
    * Chronic obstructive respiratory disease with limited exercise tolerance and requiring oxygen
    * Genetic or congenital disorders: muscular dystrophies, cystic fibrosis, thalassaemia major, sickle cell anaemia if more than one sickle crisis in 4 years, severe haemophilia, and severe primary immunodeficiencies
    * Severe autoimmune disease, currently being treated with immuno-suppressants other than prednisone
    * In a person up to the age of 21 years, a severe (71-90 decibels) hearing loss or profound bilateral sensori-neural hearing loss
    * In a person up to the age of 21 years, a severe vision impairment with visual acuity of 6/36 or beyond after best possible correction, or a loss restricting the field of vision to 15-20 degrees
    * In a person up to the age of 21 years, a severe physical disability, where they are unable to stand and walk without support, and cannot independently dress, eat, hold a cup, or maintain their stability when sitting.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    36,907

    Default

    Simulpost of the same info, there, I see.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Thank you so much for the replies.

    I think that this might 'cross' me out. I am scheduled to start taking methotrexate, which is an immunosupressive. RA tends to be progressive, so they might frown on that.

    I really don't have any other checks in the plus column to offset that. I'm in school to earn a BS in environmental science; my OH is an excellent truck driver. That's about it...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    36,907

    Default

    So sorry to hear that.

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