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Thread: Teachers NZQA Assessment

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Cool Teachers NZQA Assessment

    Currently waiting to hear back from my EOI after being selected. Then will need to send off my qualifications to be assessed as a primary teacher and will then receive my level. We are not looking to move until 2012 so does this mean that I will have to have my qualifications reassessed as I will have completed another two years experience in the UK and will be on another level? Or would this just be taken into account (the fact that I have more years experience) when I actually come to getting a job in NZ. Does the NZQA assessment have an expiry date? If so I presume I will need to have my qualifications reassessed at the time of leaving? Any help would be appreciated

    Is it true that NZ houses don't have central heating? WIll be looking to move to north of Auckland area and reading it is very cold in the winter???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Hello and welcome.

    Are you talking about getting your qualifications assessed by NZQA? And is this for your registration with the NZ Teaching Council?

    I have seen some forum members says that their assessments from NZQA state on them that they have a three-year validity, but I don't know if that is so for all of them. NZIS say they go by whatever is on the document. If you're wondering about what you submit to the teaching council, you would probably do well to check with them directly via their website.

    It is indeed true that very few NZ houses have central heating, and most except quite new-builds have little in the way of insulation. The actual temperatures in the winter in Auckland and farther north are not very low - in fact, they're often on a level with a miserable summer day in southern England! - but because of higher humidity than English people are used to, indoors, particularly at night, it tends to FEEL much colder. There are coping techniques and equipment for the short-term, and/but many immigrants will want to improve their buildings. If you do a search on the site, you will find A LOT of discussion on these matters. I'll find a couple of references for you.

  3. #3
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    Feb 2008
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    http://www.tourism.net.nz/new-zealan...d-climate.html
    http://www.wunderground.com/history/...q_statename=NA (On this site, you can go right through the year seeing temperatures, sunshine and rainfall on every day.)

    This was me talking about how to tackle sleeping comfortably in Auckland in winter.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by althea
    Is it really possible to sleep without heating at night in a non central heated, single glazed flat??? I know I'd freeze...
    It depends more on what you get used to, and how you go about things. When we rented a house in the Waitakeres in August, it took us back to how conditions were in most homes in the UK in our childhood, but there were some modern appliances which helped, once we knew what to do.

    This was our routine, coached by Kiwi relatives.

    The bed needs to be made up with several layers, under you and over you, to insulate you and keep your body-heat in. You can always push off a layer or two if you get too warm, then just pull them back over as necessary, but they need to be right there so you don't have to get out and go looking.

    About half an hour to 40 minutes before going to bed, put on dehumidifier in bedroom, possibly heater as well depending on how cold it feels. Dry air doesn't feel as cold as damp air. Also put on electric blanket, or put hot water bottles in the bed.

    Get into your nightclothes in a warm room, so you don't lose body-heat. Your nightclothes need to be a little micro-climate of your own - long-sleeved, long-legged in warm material, worn with socks, and maybe a fleece or jumper. What you choose depends on where YOU feel the cold.

    Just before you get into bed, turn off the dehumidifier (and heater and electric blanket, if used). You can keep the hot water bottle(s) in with you if you want. You are warm yourself, in a warmed, insulated bed, breathing dry air, and should be able to get to sleep. Once asleep, people can usually cope with breathing cooler air as long as their body stays warm.
    In the daytime, you tend to heat the space you are in, and keep your own microclimate warm - e.g. more layers of clothes, warm socks, scarf, which are not so usual indoors in the UK. Dry air feels much warmer than damp, and dehumidifiers are very useful - you run them after using a bath or shower, since there's little point in opening a window if the air outdoors is humid itself. Also, if you're trying to dry washing by hanging it indoors, runnig the dehumidifier right next to it speeds things up a lot.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for post Althea, yes it was asking about registration with NZQA and application to teaching council. I will get on to them directly as you have advised. Will keep you posted.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Sorry for the confusion. That was ME posting - I just cut-and-pasted in my answer to a question Althea had originally asked.

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