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Thread: Reporting US birth abroad

  1. #1
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    Jun 2009
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    Dunedin
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    Default Reporting US birth abroad

    Hi, we just had a baby!

    We're in Dunedin. I'm a US citizen and my partner is Italian. I'm trying to find out what we need to do for getting NZ, US, and/or Italian citizenship for our baby. Anyone have any tips on what our next step is?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I am pretty sure you just need to contact the US embassy. Check out the US State Department website as there is probably info regarding this there.

  3. #3
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    Feb 2008
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    Congratulations to both of you! What did you have?

    As you have PR, your child acquired NZ nationality at birth. You have a genuine little Kiwi.

    You also almost certainly have a little American. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_...ationality_law

    A person born on or after November 14, 1986, is a U.S. citizen if all of the following are true:[7]

    One of the person's parents was a U.S. citizen when the person in question was born
    The citizen parent lived at least five years in the United States before the child's birth
    A minimum of two of these five years in the United States were after the citizen parent's 14th birthday.
    ...
    A person's record of birth abroad, if registered with a U.S. consulate or embassy, is proof of citizenship. Such a person may also apply for a passport or a Certificate of Citizenship to have a record of citizenship. Such documentation is often useful to prove citizenship in lieu of the availability of an American birth certificate.
    The situation with Italian nationality isn't as clear. You will need to ask the embassy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_nationality_law

  4. #4
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    First, CONGRATS on your baby kiwi!!

    Just my 2 cents (that you didn't ask for and hopefully won't offend you) but here goes:

    your child will be entitled to US citizenship in the future but I would let them decide if that is something that he (or she) wants.

    As a US citizen, you are liable for taxes--no matter where you live--- FOREVER!!

    Sure, it mostly evens out (unless you are self employed) but it is still a hassle to have to think about and file. So it might be something that you leave as an option to be decided at a later date.

  5. #5
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    If we decide to let the baby defer citizenship until later, do we still need to report the birth to the consulate?

  6. #6
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    I'm not sure if you do need to contact the US consulate about the birth. What I do know is that there is no requirement to choose US citizenship at time of birth (unless laws have recently changed). I knew many friends back in Canada who were born in the US but lived their life in Canada for most of their life. When I was at college, one US born friend had to choose his choice of citizenship (either US or Canadian) when was age 18 or 19. At that moment, it wasn't the matter that he could claim US citizenship, it was the fact that his life and where he was meant that he could not see any future of wanting to live in the US. So what i'm getting at is choose your citizenship wisely because as others know, US citizenship comes with a whole string of responsibilities (ie. annual tax filing to the IRS for life), but then it comes with other benefits like the strong power of the US embassy has for saving their citizens abroad in times of disaster.

    I also fail to see the benefit of having more than a dual citizenship simultaneously. Already when traveling abroad, you're suppose to stick with 1 passport as it creates confusion when checking across different countries. The key benefit of citizenship is allow free passage to the country. So no visa requirements like work visas, etc. But then I also fail to see why one can't apply for citizenship at the time he/she wishes to live in that country.

  7. #7
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    Dunedin
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    Thanks for the info!

    So when I talk to the consulate, do I need to consider them an "interested party", in the sense that their protocol might push me toward getting citizenship, so that the US can get the taxes later on?

  8. #8
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    Congrats!

    As far as US embassy help goes, you will only get assistance if your primary residence is in the US. Your littl'un will be considered a Kiwi unless he or she moves to the US and establishes residence there.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by denalipop View Post
    Thanks for the info!

    So when I talk to the consulate, do I need to consider them an "interested party", in the sense that their protocol might push me toward getting citizenship, so that the US can get the taxes later on?
    I am not sure if their only motivation is purely tax based, but they do want you to obtain citizenship for the child as soon as possible after birth even though you can do it up to the age of 18. I would consider them an "interested party."

    http://www.travel.state.gov/law/fami...birth_593.html

    As an American myself, I cannot see any real benefit to getting citizenship for your child at this moment do to the potential tax obligations it will incur for your child later in life. You have until they are 18 to do it so there is really no rush in my opinion.

  10. #10
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    I'm doing this in October.
    The consulate will email you the forms you need for passport/SSN (which either need to be filed in person in Auckland or at an outreach appointment, or signed in front of a Justice of the Peace), but you can basically just email the consulate for information to report the birth.
    http://newzealand.usembassy.gov/birth_abroad.html

    Someone told me (or I read somewhere) that if your child is eligible to be a citizen and they travel to the US NOT on a US passport that their citizenship becomes forfeit.
    Considering all the other ridiculous things the US does to it's expats I wouldn't be surprised if it was true. I don't think it's true (though as I said, wouldn't be surprised if it was), but I did find some stuff stating that if they don't travel to the US on a US passport other paperwork has to be filled out so maybe that's the basis of that.

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