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Thread: giving up original citizenship

  1. #1
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    Default giving up original citizenship

    There are several threads and even more posts from people having been granted NZ citizenship.

    As far as I have observed it they generally take on the NZ without letting the other go. I would be interested in reading from people who gave up their original citizenship when receiving the NZ one.

    How does it affect one when changing the allegiance and not 'just' adding another one?

  2. #2
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    Interesting topic- but I would think that on here almost everyone gets to keep their original citizenship when they take on the NZ one.
    It seems that there are very few countries (like Germany) making it so hard to take on a second one!?

  3. #3
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    I'm pretty sure the Netherlands doesn't allow dual citizenship, and neither do Norway or Sweden apart from those aquired automatically at birth. The Dutch family I know via school are not planning on ever applying for citizenship for this reason and are sticking with their PR. And a Swedish/British family I know were telling me that when their kids reach 21 (?) they have to choose to keep either their British or their Swedish passports, and are not allowed both...so they are also not sure whether to bother applying for Kiwi citizenship as it would make things even more complicated for their kids.

  4. #4
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    Just out of interest, does anyone actually know which countries don't allow dual citizenship? Both Sweden and Netherlands do allow it, but don't know about Norway...

  5. #5
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    Multiple citizenships is a fascinating topic as many countries' laws seem to be created on whims rather than on practical/rational grounds.

    When one acquires US citizenship through naturalization, the oath of allegiance one takes automatically cancels all other citizenships. However, some countries have devised ways so that their former citizens can reacquire their previous citizenships after they become US citizens. The US laws don't have any problem with that so long the dual citizen uses only the US passport to exit from and enter the US.

    Unless thing have changed in the recent years, citizens of Russia, Ukraine and perhaps some other former USSR countries cannot give up their citizenships without their government's express consent. So when a Ukrainian becomes a US citizen, even though through taking the oath of allegiance she formally renounces her prior citizenship, she'll be (sometimes, mis-)treated as a citizen of Ukraine if she travels to that country.

    Then there are issues of attitude. I have heard of hostility shown by immigration officers of some countries to their former citizens who carry passports of other countries.

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  7. #7
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    Here are some other interesting links....

    http://www.multiplecitizenship.com/countrylist.html

    http://www.multiplecitizenship.com/wscl/ws_SWEDEN.html

    And Norway seems pretty strict, even if you are born there....
    http://www.multiplecitizenship.com/wscl/ws_NORWAY.html
    Last edited by Familyofmonkeys; 4th June 2011 at 12:58 AM.

  8. #8
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    Thanks so far for your contribution.

    What I am interested here in this instance is how people are dealing with it personally. What are the emotions they go through over time after 'switching' allegiance. How do they rationalise it? What might it be comparable to?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NJ2NZ View Post
    Multiple citizenships is a fascinating topic as many countries' laws seem to be created on whims rather than on practical/rational grounds.

    When one acquires US citizenship through naturalization, the oath of allegiance one takes automatically cancels all other citizenships. However, some countries have devised ways so that their former citizens can reacquire their previous citizenships after they become US citizens. The US laws don't have any problem with that so long the dual citizen uses only the US passport to exit from and enter the US.

    Unless thing have changed in the recent years, citizens of Russia, Ukraine and perhaps some other former USSR countries cannot give up their citizenships without their government's express consent. So when a Ukrainian becomes a US citizen, even though through taking the oath of allegiance she formally renounces her prior citizenship, she'll be (sometimes, mis-)treated as a citizen of Ukraine if she travels to that country.

    Then there are issues of attitude. I have heard of hostility shown by immigration officers of some countries to their former citizens who carry passports of other countries.


    My family and I have US and UK citizenship and as you correctly stated we just have to leave/enter US on our US passports. We applied for our PR as US Citizens.

  10. #10
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    Apparently the USA, Canada and Australia are OK with multiple citizenships as I have all three. Cant address the issue of giving up citizenship as I've thankfully never had to. If forced however, I do feel a stronger allegiance to Australia as that is where I was born (the other two places gave me citizenship through descent - parents)

    Amy.

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