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Thread: US electrical adapters??? its still a fog

  1. #21
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    Yes you can do that. Typically the N.A. power bars use wiring that is 250vac rated insulation (this can be confirmed by reading the fine printing on the side of the power cord). There are cheap ones from the $1 store that I would stay away from as they may be only 125volt max rating. Big thick wire and heavy duty switches should be no problem at all.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian Cat View Post
    If I have North America items that will work on NZ power but just need the wall plug converter, is it possible to just get one North American power bar and one plug converter for it instead of one for each item?

    Example:

    [PC]-------------->[Power Bar Plug]
    [PS3]------------->[Power Bar Plug]
    [Monitor]--------->[Power Bar Plug]------>[Plug Converter]>[NZ Wall Socket]
    [Hard Drive]------>[Power Bar Plug]
    [Speakers]------->[Power Bar Plug]
    I can confirm that this will not work if the power strip has a surge protector!!!

    After the loud explosion, I was afraid to try with the non-surge protected strip. I'll leave that to the electricians to theorize about...

  3. #23
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    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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    Thanks Super, good to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by 72andsunny View Post
    I can confirm that this will not work if the power strip has a surge protector!!!
    I have a ton of heavy duty ones here at home, but none of the original packaging and it doesn't say anything on the strip itself. Is there a way to tell if a power strip has a surge protector or not?

  4. #24
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    The surge protectors I've come across have all had either a light or a button to indicate their status.

  5. #25
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    The cheap multi-outlet power bars with a surge protector are only a 1 off event safety. The recessed button on the bar will go bang in an event of a surge and the power bar has to be thrown out. The better power bars use an actual circuit breaker which is resettable.

    IMO, surge protection from power bars are junk. Even the fancy brands (that claim huge $ insurance on your electronics) sold at electronic shops (ie. Monster Cable) will not save the devices in a major electrical event such as lightning that strikes your house. They're only designed for slow, low current surges. To protect devices from real lightning, you need electronics and isolating transformers - but these do not come in small power bar packaging. Why is this so? Because the components used in these power bars can not react 'fast enough' to trip the breaker in time. My electronics friend has told me that you need a lot more than some bi-metallic strip to protect against lightning.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Super_BQ View Post
    The cheap multi-outlet power bars with a surge protector are only a 1 off event safety. The recessed button on the bar will go bang in an event of a surge and the power bar has to be thrown out. The better power bars use an actual circuit breaker which is resettable.
    Have you actually tried using one of these BQ? It seems to me that even a higher grade device would view the higher voltage as a surge and shut down...probably would not be as dramatic as my experience, but it still wouldn't work in the scenario mentioned above.

  7. #27
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    a surge protector set for US at 110v will always 'see' anything over 150v as a surge.
    at least if its any good it will.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Super_BQ View Post
    ...
    IMO, surge protection from power bars are junk. Even the fancy brands (that claim huge $ insurance on your electronics) sold at electronic shops (ie. Monster Cable) will not save the devices in a major electrical event such as lightning that strikes your house. They're only designed for slow, low current surges. To protect devices from real lightning, you need electronics and isolating transformers - but these do not come in small power bar packaging. Why is this so? Because the components used in these power bars can not react 'fast enough' to trip the breaker in time. My electronics friend has told me that you need a lot more than some bi-metallic strip to protect against lightning.
    What do you use to protect devices from fake lightning

    Ian

  9. #29
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  10. #30
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    Most things with in line transformers also say on them (small print) 110-240v .
    A lot of newer computers also make the switch automatically
    Some machines do not work properly even then because 60 cycles is not common to everywhere
    The problemcomes in when you need to reduce the 220 to 110 .. THAT requires a hefty transformer .. one for each major appliance .. at least one for kitchen appliances ... it adds up.
    I did this when I went from canada to UK and it was a nuisance ... untill the transformer failed one day taking out several other things in a blaze of glory as 240 v went straight through 110 equipment

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