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Thread: What if you don't make the LTSSL?

  1. #1
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    Default What if you don't make the LTSSL?

    Okay, on the difficult side of things, it looks like my husband's work skills are not on the LTSSL list (or any of the other lists). He is in the construction business, but his particular specialty didn't make the big list. That's the bad news for us.

    But, on the other hand, we do have some things in our favor. Due to the quake, constuction companies in ChristChurch are looking to hire a lot of new workers. So here's my question: since my husband doesn't fit the specific qualifications on the LTSSL list, could he still be hired by a NZ employer? I understand that these companies are supposed to hire locally if possible, but do you think it would be a possibility for him to get a job from one of these places? (He does have a good-looking CV, having had years of hands-on experience in this type of work, as well as having run his own business).

    If so, we could possibly push our points as high as 170, if he could get a job offer (worth 50 points; we're currently at about 110-120).

    Curious to know what you all think.

  2. #2
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    See 'I have a job offer from a New Zealand employer' here. http://www.immigration.govt.nz/migra.../requirements/

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tabby View Post
    Okay, on the difficult side of things, it looks like my husband's work skills are not on the LTSSL list (or any of the other lists). He is in the construction business, but his particular specialty didn't make the big list.
    On a general note - without knowing this speciality: I would think it is a wee bit telling if his job his even not on the CSSL, wouldn't you? So it might be rather difficult to prove the demand. The sp0ecial circumstances might be different of course!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralf-nz View Post
    On a general note - without knowing this speciality: I would think it is a wee bit telling if his job his even not on the CSSL, wouldn't you? So it might be rather difficult to prove the demand. The sp0ecial circumstances might be different of course!
    The positions on the LTSSL list (for the construction trade) include project managers, planners, site supervisors, and surveyors. All these roles entail planning or overseeing a project. My husband has the skills and experience to DO the actual work (many companies are hiring "hammer hands" right now). (He can do framing, roofing, plumbing, some electrical work, painting, can hang drywall, tape and mud, hang doors and windows, hang vinyl and concrete siding, do trimwork, build cabinets, lay tile and wood floors, etc., etc., etc.) He has 10+ years of experience. In addition, he has owned and run his own construction business with his father. So in practical terms, he has experience managing and supervising, though he may not meet all the technical requirements (like a national diploma, and having had so many years of experience with a company - since he only ever worked for himself). He does have the skills and experience necessary in the construction trade; I would think those skills could be further developed to broaden his horizons in this field if an employer was willing to hire and train him for a specific position. (Also as an asset, he possesses a bachelor's degree in Business Administration). I know we still have a lot of hurdles...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralf-nz View Post
    On a general note - without knowing this speciality: I would think it is a wee bit telling if his job his even not on the CSSL, wouldn't you? So it might be rather difficult to prove the demand. The sp0ecial circumstances might be different of course!
    I don't know about the construction industry but I found my skills to be in demand and have got a very good job as a result, and nothing even vaguely close to what I do is on any list. I am sure the skills on the lists are in short supply but I don't think it is necessarily all the skills that are in demand.

    Tabby - If your husband has a good skillset and a decent amount of experience he has every chance of finding work, and there is no harm in trying.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JandM View Post
    See 'I have a job offer from a New Zealand employer' here. http://www.immigration.govt.nz/migra.../requirements/
    I checked it out. Thanks.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lauralocks View Post
    I don't know about the construction industry but I found my skills to be in demand and have got a very good job as a result, and nothing even vaguely close to what I do is on any list. I am sure the skills on the lists are in short supply but I don't think it is necessarily all the skills that are in demand.

    Tabby - If your husband has a good skillset and a decent amount of experience he has every chance of finding work, and there is no harm in trying.
    That's good to hear. Thanks. We'll keep our eyes open.

  8. #8
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    In these lists there are basically three categories: Construction (overseeing), Engineering (planning and monitoring) and Trades (doing).

    From what you are writing your husband fits generally in category 'Trades', where the lists don't 'offer' too much on construction sites: Only electrician and scaffolder, but not the typical building trades.
    However considering he ran his own business I too think he might qualify in the category 'Construction' as a 'Project Builder (including Building Project Manager and Site Foreman) (133112)'. So you need to discuss this with NZQA and INZ.

    Perhaps easier might be the way via a job offer from an 'accredited employer', aiming for 'work to residence' (i.e. permanent).

    Alternatively you might think about a work visa (i.e. temporary) with a 'general' job offer; and your husband would undertake steps to gain an 'approved' qualification here.

  9. #9
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    Did you get (permanent) residence based on your job?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralf-nz View Post
    In these lists there are basically three categories: Construction (overseeing), Engineering (planning and monitoring) and Trades (doing).

    From what you are writing your husband fits generally in category 'Trades', where the lists don't 'offer' too much on construction sites: Only electrician and scaffolder, but not the typical building trades.
    However considering he ran his own business I too think he might qualify in the category 'Construction' as a 'Project Builder (including Building Project Manager and Site Foreman) (133112)'. So you need to discuss this with NZQA and INZ.

    Perhaps easier might be the way via a job offer from an 'accredited employer', aiming for 'work to residence' (i.e. permanent).

    Alternatively you might think about a work visa (i.e. temporary) with a 'general' job offer; and your husband would undertake steps to gain an 'approved' qualification here.
    You confirm my thoughts on this. I agree that the last two options you mentioned might be our best bet. Thanks for the input.

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