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Thread: Working in NZ with a BS degree in Anthropology

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Los Angeles, CA
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    42

    Default Working in NZ with a BS degree in Anthropology

    Good afternoon all,

    I live in Los Angeles, CA and I'm pondering the thought of relocating to NZ.
    I've been looking for job opportunities but it seems I'm a bit lost since I don't know where I could find any listings regarding my field of study.
    I have a bachelors degree in anthropology.
    So my questions is:
    Does anyone know where or how I could find a reasonable job opportunity in my field of expertise.
    Currently, I'm a logistics analyst for greyhound bus company.

    I'm not sure if this will help, but thanks again for the help.

    Sincerely,

    Leonardo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    36,084

    Default

    The first three hits here may be of some interest. http://www.google.co.uk/#hl=en&sclie...iw=818&bih=519 At the least, they may give you an idea of people or institutions you could approach directly.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2008
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    Poole, UK to Chch, NZ
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    hello I have a degree in anth too, and have never managed to get a job in that field! currently I work as a PA to a school principal, but as a mum to a school aged child that does suit me pretty well.

    There are anth-related jobs here, particularly around Maori issues I'd say. The problem you'd face there is language, because there is a te reo revival going on. Slowly, but in a Maori organisation there would be a lot of code-switching, so you'd hear a lot of unusual kupu from your whanau while doing your mahi, e hoa If you ever fancy getting into that, I can highly recommend the (FREE!!!!) Level 2 Te Ara Reo course at Te Wananga o Aotearoa. I've been doing it in the evenings this year, finish (hopefully!) next month and it's been a blast: good fun, good people, and very useful info about tikanga Maori as well as te reo

    te reo = the language
    te ara = the path
    kupu = words
    whanau = family (applied to colleagues, in this case)
    mahi = work
    e hoa = friend
    tikanga = culture, customs

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Wellington, NZ
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    Default

    I also have a degree in Social Anthropology and the History & Philosophy of Science but I've never persued a career in it to be honest. It was handy in securing me points for Residency though. I would look to contact University Departments for further information. Good luck!

  5. #5
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    May 2012
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    NZ (Auckland; via Canada)
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    I've met 2 anthros at the uni, both specialise in the Pacific. Which makes sense, given the location of NZ. But most folks working in anth have at least an MA.

  6. #6
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    Sep 2012
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    NZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odranoel View Post
    [edited]
    I have a bachelors degree in anthropology.
    I'm a logistics analyst for greyhound bus company.
    So my questions is: how I could find a reasonable job opportunity in my field of expertise.
    My question when UG graduates come to me for carear advice is to ask them what they want to spend their time doing, and then ensure that each step along their plan is increasingly focused on that. I'm not sure which field is your field of expertise, anthropology or logistics analysis. As has already been said, to work in anthropology (where there are many many more graduates than jobs in the sector) requires a lot of effort and often postgraduate degrees. You could consider a Research Assistant post, but those are hotly contested and usually require having done either a very related honours thesis or at least having a very good degree result (a 2:1 or a 1st class degree). As for a postgraduate degree, these are often exhausting and expensive (take it from one who knows) so only do this if you are passionate about the specific area of study.

    It may make more sense than either to see both as providing you with some good transferable skills that allows you to follow your developmental plan (whatever that is).

  7. #7
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    Oct 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
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    Thank you for the help.
    Could someone help me understand the point system? How could I find out my worthiness in terms of NZ immigration?
    @Sophiedb, I have friends in NZ (ethnically Samoan and a few Maori) would you say my best bet would be to directly contact them for employment opportunities in their community whilst working in my master's degree?
    What would anyone suggest?

    Thanks all

  8. #8
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    Feb 2008
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    36,084

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    Could someone help me understand the point system? How could I find out my worthiness in terms of NZ immigration?
    What actually don't you understand? Have you found the points calculator on the INZ website?

    This page http://www.immigration.govt.nz/opsmanual/i41496.htm from the INZ operational manual sets out the points which are available, and the column on the right refers you to other pages with the detailed regulations about that topic. Which MAY help. Come back if you stick on particular aspects.

  9. #9
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    Sep 2012
    Location
    NZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odranoel View Post
    Could someone help me understand the point system? How could I find out my worthiness in terms of NZ immigration?
    I think this one is quite easy to use.

    You can check whether your specific degree is already recognised here (you didn't mention which institution you studied at).

    I used the first link and guessed that you are a single mid-20's with 6+ years work experience (outside of an immediate or long term skills shortage area) with a recognised UG degree and your score came back as 100. This satisfies the minimum level to apply for a work visa but is below a level where you can expect a positive outcome (I guess you never know). Best option seems to be for a student visa if you want to go to study. From there you can apply for a Graduate Job Search visa. I'm not trying to be funny, but you'll need to put more independent effort into this process if you want it to bear fruit.

  10. #10
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    Oct 2012
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    Los Angeles, CA
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    Thank you for the help. I will refer to all the links in order to familiarize myself with the due process. Thanks all!!

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