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Thread: year seven/eight

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Canada/NZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by JandM View Post
    Excuse the interruption - just from curiosity, what writing do they learn in schools in Canada, then?
    They only use printing (not joined up) or printed out on a computer. I find it sad, the art of hand-writing is gone in one generation.

    Thanks Sophie, nice website!

    (We've hit another speed-bump so it looks like he won't be starting in February as hoped. I'm going for the longest time to emigrate in enz history lol.)

  2. #12
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    Feb 2008
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    The daft thing is, it's NOT just an art - it has practical usefulness. Once ingrained (just getting over the hump of remembering to do it, not print), it's WAY faster than rushed printing, and more legible, too. I don't believe that the next generation is going to turn to the computer every time they want to leave a note for the rest of the family, or jot down the ten things they need from the shops.

  3. #13
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    the art is also in the kindness of a handwritten note...the next generation records their supermarket list onto their smart phone with voice recognition software, and tweets or facebook notifies their family...

  4. #14
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    Feb 2008
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    See my head shaking sadly...

  5. #15

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    Ok so I did year 7 and 8 in 2002 and 2003 so my memory may be hazy and things may be out of date. But maybe my personal recollection will help a little (or not!)

    In year 7 I had a very good teacher. Note: at intermediate, children have one classroom teacher for subjects like maths, english, science, social studies, and PE. They had specialist teachers for art, music, technology etc. Anyway, my class was very structured and we knew what was expected of us. We had our own little wooden desks which opened up and we kept our books inside. We had a monday-friday timetable (so I always had food technology during the last period on a friday afternoon - yay!) The first few days were about getting to know each other (lots of name games and stuff) and we made an "about me" collage type thing.

    In subjects like English, we went through various topics (I actually found some of my books a few weeks ago, such a trip down memory lane!), and the teacher would mark our work and highlight any incorrectly spelt words. We'd then have to write them out three times. We'd also have these big serious spelling tests to see how we were going. But we had to stick of lot of things into our books and then colour them in. I've just found my actual book and there's stuff on haikus, limericks, the plot and characters in Twelfth Night... There's all this stuff in the back of my book called "SRA" and then there's a colour and a number. These must be age level or curriculum things that we worked through... looks like just finding the right answer to something.... Oh and we HAD to do a speech and participate in a debate.

    I vaguely remember science (finding my old books helps), and we had different topics we went through. On the rare occasion, we were allowed into the science lab to see a real science experiment or something. Most of the time, we were just in the home classroom. I think it was stuff like "how does a solid turn to a liquid".....

    I remember year 8 a little better. We had switched to a 6 day timetable so each day was different (no food tech every friday afternoon!) Day 6 was a day to try out different things for a term. So I did netball, calligraphy, french, and spanish. Anyway, my classroom teacher wasn't that great and things weren't as structured. I have a memory of a maths "lesson" in which the teacher said something like "if you have any problems, talk to A, B, and C" (names of children in our class!!!)

    I have my social studies book here. Topics include the Americas Cup (this was 2003), "crafty consumer" (GST, needs and wants, wise consumer tips, analysing different products, even a poem about consuming!!!), "the impact of technology over time" (looking at the dates of inventions etc., writing about the TV, safety in cars, a project on wheels with a friend), "mapping" (map drawing, grid references, NZ).

    Year 8 english = adjectives, work from a text book, speeches, euphemisms, spelling, designing a chocolate bar wrapper (is that even English?!) which includes a story board for advertising the chocolate bar, writing about a character (in my case, my sister), writing about a fruit, a debate, limericks, parts of speech (alliteration, adjectives etc.), dictation (writing down what the teacher was saying), spelling, instructional writing (eg. writing a recipe). At the back of my book, I have chapter summaries (including a drawing) for a book we had to read.

    I remember doing sex education and general health/puberty stuff in year 8. We had stuff about how it's important to have a shower and use deodorant, the obvious stuff about how the body changes during puberty etc etc etc.

    Well hopefully that will give you a little peak into the curriculum for some subjects at least 9-10 years ago! PM me if you have any questions.

  6. #16

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    Ps. We had these tests we did before and after a topic. That way we could see how much we knew before, and then how much we had learnt after the topic. They were the basis for our reports. This might have changed now due to national standards, I'm not sure.

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