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Thread: different work visa types -> apply to one or several at once?

  1. #1
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    Default different work visa types -> apply to one or several at once?

    Hi there,

    I prepare my applicaiton for a work visa. In general I think I would fulfill the requirements for three types:

    -essential skills
    -work to residence (Long Term Skill Shortage List)
    -work to residence (accredited employer)



    Q1: This is my fist application (I have never worked/lived in NZ before). Can I really apply for the workto residence via nowor only after 2 years of employment in NZ?
    Q2: In case I can select multiple types: Can/should I tick all three types in the application form (page 3)?
    Q3: In case I can only select one: Which one is the best (what exactly are the advantages of each type)?

    I got a bit lost on the nz imigration site...
    Can anybody help me?

    Thanks,
    Anke

  2. #2
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    Hello and welcome.

    You can only apply for one visa at a time.

    And I suggest you let us know what your line of work is, and what qualifications you have, as this may help people comment helpfully.

    The first thing that occurs to me to ask is, do you have a job offer in NZ? As you need a job offer to qualify for these visas. (Don't despair - there are other routes you could take.)

  3. #3
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    Hi, thanks for your quick answer!
    I have a job offer as a senior lecturer at the University of Otago. Qualification is a doctorate and work experience in research and teaching.

  4. #4
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    Great!

    In that case, I should think the WTR, or a temporary work visa under essential skills, supported by your accredited employer, are equally good to choose. The fact that your employer is already known to INZ and checked out by them to support workers such as yourself with the skills they need will shorten the process for you. The university is likely to want you to do this, so as to arrive and start working as quickly as possible. They may advise you towards one or the other - they will be very used to the whole routine.

    If you wish, you can also apply for Residence under the Skilled Migrant Category (without waiting for two years to pass) - by doing this within the same space of time, you will be able to use much of the same evidence, and save yourself the expense of doing another medical, set of police checks, etc., at a later date.

  5. #5
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    based on your other answer I think I appreciate the accredited employer version in order to save the effort to get my doctorate certificate translated etc.

  6. #6
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    Unfortunately, with that visa, you still need to provide proof that you are qualified to do the job, so I think you're going to have to find a translator - sorry! http://www.immigration.govt.nz/NR/rd.../0/INZ1016.pdf (p.5)

  7. #7
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    Hello!

    I came to NZ for a similar role at Auckland a few months ago. My choices were WTR or go for full skilled migrant visa. Looking at the processes involved, I told my employer I would prefer to delay my arrival by 4-6 weeks and get the full visa. They agreed, although I had to pay any expenses above the costs for a WTR visa. I had an application complicated with a medical referral (expected) and a late request for ANOTHER security clearance and it still look just 6 weeks--it would've been probably 2-3 week otherwise.

    Otago's an approved employer and lecturer's on the long term skills shortage list. Assuming you've got no criminal record or major health issues, you should get a SMC permanent residence visa approved very quickly. If you go WTR, you'll need to do the equivalent of an SMC application later anyways.

    Quote Originally Posted by vaul10 View Post
    Hi, thanks for your quick answer!
    I have a job offer as a senior lecturer at the University of Otago. Qualification is a doctorate and work experience in research and teaching.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JandM View Post
    Unfortunately, with that visa, you still need to provide proof that you are qualified to do the job, so I think you're going to have to find a translator - sorry! http://www.immigration.govt.nz/NR/rd.../0/INZ1016.pdf (p.5)
    I think you are referring to pg. 5 "You must also provide..."? I thought this only applies to the visa types mentioned above. On the other hand the title of the section is "Requirements for all visas based on employment".
    Thanks for pointing it out!

  9. #9
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    Hi jawnbc,
    thanks fo your comment.
    No, no criminal record . Also no health issues so far.
    We also thought about applying for permanent residency directly as the University offers to pay one set of visa. But an immigration advisor (knowing our situation) told us it could take 9-12 months in some cases, so we decided only to apply for a work visa now. Furthermore application for permanent residency is more difficult than for a work visa.We would have needed the help of an advisor, I guess and they are quite expensive (and not covered by the University).Additionally you need the English test for PR if you donīt have an English spekaing background. And I learned you can skip this when you apply from NZ. So I think the work to residency version is the better option for our situation. A future colleague told me one could negotiate financial support fro the PR visa later, too.

  10. #10
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    We would have needed the help of an advisor, I guess
    No, you don't need an advisor to go for SMC. The INZ website and notes they send out gives you all the same information an advisor does, for free.

    Anyway, all the best with whatever your next steps are.

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