Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: NZ primary school reading scheme

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    56

    Default NZ primary school reading scheme

    Hi, does anyone know if/how the NZ reading scheme matches up to the Oxford Reading Tree used in the UK? My daughter (aged 5) has just started school in year 1 but as she had already done over a year of school in the UK I just want to check she is reading at the level of her ability

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex, UK
    Posts
    2,235

    Default

    Not that I know of. They have different coloured stickers on their books, and I assume this corresponds to a level (like reading at 'turquoise' now or 'amber' or whatever).

    Do the books look right? Is she enjoying reading them? I've kind of given up on arguing with the schools over this and we just read what we think works at home.

    They do tests, though, usually at the beginning of the year in Term 1 to place them, so maybe that would tell you where she's at?

    Daniela

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Thanks Daniela

    She is reading orange books and can read them fluently and comfortably which is good. At this stage I know I should be happy that she is settling well into her class rather than worrying about making sure she is stretched and challenge! I think I still have a very UK view of school

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex, UK
    Posts
    2,235

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi_adventure View Post
    At this stage I know I should be happy that she is settling well into her class rather than worrying about making sure she is stretched and challenge! I think I still have a very UK view of school
    We had some issues with the school placing our boys initially, they got it quite spectacularly wrong in one case. It did get sorted in the end, but wasn't good at all. So I do understand what you mean. However, after three years in the UK and 5 years in the NZ system, I have adjusted my expectations for primary school. Here, it seems to be largely a place for social gathering, lunchtime playing and organising afternoon playdates. They play lots, they have fun, largely enjoy going to school. And I think that is fine for the little ones, the older they get, the more I found that if I really want them to learn stuff, I need to do it at home.

    Daniela

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    2,691

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dharder View Post
    the older they get, the more I found that if I really want them to learn stuff, I need to do it at home.

    Daniela
    That was pretty much my experience too, which is why we are now home educating.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Christchurch from Scotland
    Posts
    2,226

    Default

    I have had the opposite experience of Daniela and Familyofmonkeys and have been surprised at the grammar terms, science and Maths currently being undertaken by my children at primary level. While one of my sons has special needs I have not had to fight for additional support, it has been freely given and not just put down to behavioral issues and not trying hard enough as in the UK.

    With reading I would speak to your child's teacher to get an indication if she is finding it too easy. Remember though that it is not only being able to read that is tested but also comprehension of what is read, being able to infer things from the text etc. I have found that the teachers have been happy to work to the child's level rather than everyone reaching the lowest common denominator which I found was an issue in both schools the boys attended in the UK.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Warkworth , NZ
    Posts
    1,402

    Default

    After 1 yr of school here they should, according to the National Standards , be reading at green level so to be on orange now is great. ( Levels go pink, red, yellow, dark blue, green, orange........). The teacher will have done or will do a running record which shows instructional level, which may differ from class room level, and checks comprehension, inference skills and much more, so each teacher should know exactly where each child is in terms of appropriate reading levels. I would suggest getting to know the teacher and finding out for yourself. Practice at home is obviously invaluable. I have certainly found the vast majority of teachers are skilled in teaching reading at early levels, fostering a love of books and reading at an early age.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Thank you all for comments. I had decided to give her another week to see how she settles before discussing it with her teacher - however there was a note in her reading record tonight from her teacher saying that she is going to move her up a few levels next week. So I will see how that goes

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ashburton, New Zealand
    Posts
    75

    Default

    As Carey said - if she's reading at Orange in NZ she's well ahead of the programme so no need to worry. Check out http://literacyonline.tki.org.nz/Lit...g-colour-wheel if you haven't already. There's no relationship at all between the colours here and the Oxford Reading Tree in the UK.

    I'm trying to get my head around the changes as well - I've just started a teaching job back here (NZ trained and worked 3 years before leaving for UK) after working in London schools for 12 years. IMHO reading is taught FAR better here and the comprehension skills of the kids is more developed but the jury is definitely out on maths! Loving the independence of Kiwi kids as well. Also have a 6 year old daughter starting Y2 so have had the same equivalence questions...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    192

    Default

    We found the teaching of literacy in the local primary schoo lhere to be far more thorough than the one in UK but can only speak for the two schools involved.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •