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Thread: Washing machines - what would you do?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Default Washing machines - what would you do?

    Hi all

    Our washing machine here is on its last legs so needs replacing either way. We initially said we'll just wait til we get out there but now we're flinching a bit at the sight of how much they cost out there and wondering if we'd be better off getting one here and adding it to our container. But if there are any issues with it working then there's not much we'd be able to do about it. wwyd?

    Also, we're moving to Whangarei so it is going to be pretty humid most of the time. I'm just wondering what effect this is going to have on our washing. If you hang out a load to dry in humidity is it difficult to get the moisture out? Would you recommend getting a washer dryer in this climate? If so again wwyd, get one in UK or NZ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Don't forget that if you export something new and unused, you're liable for duty on it. Of course, if it's not declared, you MIGHT get away with it, but it could get picked up, then the authorities would be likely to scrutinize all the rest of your belongings even more carefully.

    An alternative to having a washer-dryer is to put your washing on an airer indoors, and run a dehumidifier in close proximity.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    UK - France - Wellington
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    Holy Moly, we're like you, our washing machine won't be making the trip. It is about 20 years old though and only works on 1 cycle nowadays so it's not a hard decision to leave it!
    But yes what to do for the next one? I hear NZ one's are top loaders also...does that make a difference to using them apart from the obvious???

    To be honest we haven't checked out any prices yet, though if it is considerably cheaper in the UK why not see how much GST would be charged?

  4. #4
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    You can get front-loaders in NZ as well, though they tend to be more expensive than top-loaders. My d-i-l preferred to pay out for a front-loader, because she's found that top-loaders wear your clothes out more quickly.

    Another NZ washing tip - if hanging your wash outdoors, turn things inside out, as the strong sunlight tends to bleach the colours.

    Yes, you can check the tax rate, or, of course, just make sure you've got sufficient proof that you've used the machine before shipping it.

  5. #5
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    I live in Bay of Islands, less than an hour north of Whangarei. I bought a Fisher & Paykel front loading washing machine - small by U.S. standards (6k) and I think I paid about $700 for it - on sale. I bought a 5k F & P clothes dryer a couple of days ago for $548 (regularly $800). I've had no problem drying clothes outside on the line, I just keep an eye on the weather forecast. The sun is hot so clothes dry fairly quickly. I can usually bring clothes in after 4 or 5 hours. If they're even a bit damp, I put them in the hot water cylinder cupboard to finish drying, the old-time Kiwi clothes dryer! The next morning, the clothes will be fully dry and toasty warm. I'm a family of one - so if you're a larger family obviously this won't be as easy for you.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2008
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    Tauranga, Bay of Plenty
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    Buy the washing machine in the UK install and run it in your current house even if its only the once. It will be classed as used so wont be liable for duty or you can buy one here but they can be expensive as said you just need to look out for the bargains in the sales which are always on.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    I agree with Catt above, buy one in the UK, use it there to check it works OK. Then ship it over in your container. They don't ask (in my experience) for evidence of when you purchased items.
    Front loaders can be expensive to fix here if they do break down, but we found it was more economical (not to mention ecological to have ours fixed (when I put too much stuff in and the drum came loose) than to buy a new one.
    You do need to check when you are buying washing powder that they are suitable for front loaders though.
    as for drying can't advise you there as humidity is not really an issue in Wellington, more making sure that everything is securely pegged on... I did once live in southern Japan which is very very humid and didn't have a dryer, just hung stuff outside and that wasn't a problem.
    As mentioned above, dry coloured items inside out as they can fade quickly. Same goes for everything - the spines of books on your shelves fade incredibly quickly due to the sunlight. Even in Wellington.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2010
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    California to Tasman Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holy Moly View Post
    Also, we're moving to Whangarei so it is going to be pretty humid most of the time. I'm just wondering what effect this is going to have on our washing. If you hang out a load to dry in humidity is it difficult to get the moisture out?
    I don't even own a dryer and I live right on the sea. When it's too damp for the clothes to completely dry, I dry them inside on a rack. I hang them out during the day, to let them get mostly dry and let the seams and waistbands finish up on the rack overnight. If I've got the fire going, they dry quicker than they do outside. When it's too warm for a fire, I have a room in my house that catches a lot of sun and I put the rack there. Sometimes the rack gets moved from room to room or outside if it clears up. For the really rainy times, I have rigged a system to hang the clothes up by the ceiling in the room with the logburner. I hang them up before I go to bed and they are dry and ready to fold in the morning when I wake. It can be done.

  9. #9
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    May 2007
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    I'll say that if you need it now, or there is a specific model that you really want that you can't buy in NZ then get it now in the UK, if not then wait till you get to NZ.

    If you do buy in the UK then keep an eye on the power that it uses, some washers and many washer dryers use too much power for NZ wiring. You can have the wiring altered if necessary but probably not in a rental. Also note that some models for sale in the UK allow the power setting to be altered from 13A to 10A, in which case they would be safe in NZ (assuming you changed the setting of course).

    Where are you looking to compare prices?

    Ian

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    UK
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    Thanks all, some really useful comments. It's good to know we do have some hope of drying our clothes in humidity without a tumble dryer. If we can get away without getting/using one we will do so that's good to know. Having chatted more just now I think we are going to wait and see what happens when we're out there. As we'll be renting there is always the chance we may end up with somewhere that includes one so may not need to worry about it. If we do then regarding front vs top loaders, how does the latter wear out your clothes and how quickly does that tend to happen? Anyone any idea if you can use eco balls or an equivalent (if you can get such a thing in NZ?) in those or does it have to be powder/tabs?

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