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Thread: Average Wage

  1. #1
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    Aug 2004
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    Whitianga. Nz. Pop; 4004
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    Default Average Wage

    Average incomes rise


    Average incomes up 6%, but men still earning $300 a week more than women on average



    6 October 2005

    Average incomes have risen nearly six percent in the past year, to $586 a week.

    The inequality between men and women remains, with men earning nearly $300 more a week on average.

    Statistics New Zealand says the average hourly wage has risen to $19.30. The highest earners are men aged 45 to 49, who are bringing in nearly $1,100 a week.

    Aucklanders are making the most money overall, closely followed by Wellingtonians and Cantabrians.

  2. #2
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    Aug 2004
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    Inland Canterbury, NZ
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    Ohh, salaries, now that I'm out in the big bad world of work this seems a hot topic (closely followed by the weather and then hooners!). Between you, me and the entire internet, there seems to be dissent amongst the troops (well, Chch Council employees) and they all seem to "reckon they'll be walk outs soon" after management got a huge rises last year and the others got a few cents above diddly squat ... which leads me to a subject that I have NO experience with and on which I need to make a decision soon.... as does everyone who works for the Chch Council, I'm eligible to join the Southern Local Govt Officers Union - and after a few conversations at work and confirmation with my team leader, I am advised that over 95% of the council workforce is a member.

    So - can someone tell me - in plain English / Kiwi - what it would mean for me to NOT be in the Union?? And, compared to the UK, is $5 a week good or bad (that's the subscription fee here).

    Thanks in advance.

    Moorf

  3. #3
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    Sep 2005
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    Hampshire...for now
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    Teaching union fees in the UK are over 100 / year (NASUWT is 114, NUT 109), so that rounds to just over 2 a week / $5 NZD. So the fees are similar.

    Speaking for teachers then you really should be in a union, very helpful with discussing matters, supposed to objective etc. Unions don't hold the power they once did, perhaps that's a good thing, perhaps it isn't, but generally you are better off being a member. Also, if the Chch union workers are planning strikes, and you are not in the union, then you can't join that strike (officially).

    http://www.unison.org.uk/join/unionbenefits.asp

  4. #4
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    Aug 2005
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    I would say that the subs sound similar to what most unions in the UK would charge, the one I work for charges 2.50 a week. If you are not in a union and they do have walk outs you will still be expected to attend work, not much fun if there's a picket line and if union membership is that high then there's likely to be, it also means you get a vote on whether to strike or not and whether indeed to accept any pay deal that might be forthcoming in the first place. In general it also means that if you have any probs at work you have someone to turn to who will fight your corner for you.
    My view would be that everyone should be in a union, but then I am a trade union organiser!
    Why don't you find out who your union rep (think they're known as delegates in NZ) is and get some info from them about what the union offers to members.
    Regards,
    Sian

  5. #5
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    Sep 2004
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    West Auckland
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    I pay 13.83 to the Royal College of Nurses (RCN - essentially our union). So that's 3.19 a week . I don't remember the NZ Nursing Union being quite so expensive. As a nurse you kind of have to belong to a union as they provide indemnity insurance in case you get sued!!

    Debs

  6. #6
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    Aug 2004
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    Hey Moorf

    I have had the same queries working for the council in Rotorua... the way it was explained to me was that if you chose not to join the union, then it doesn't affect your individual pay and conditions. The union (PSA) basically negotiates on behalf of its members, makes the agreement with the Council, and then the Council offers the same pay and conditions to non-union members. However, if you don't join then you don't necessarily have the unions back-up should things go pear shaped at any point... So i guess it depends how you view risks and how much you value the subs being in your pocket rather than the unions!

  7. #7
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    Paying $5 a week is an insurance payment in case anything goes wrong with your employment. Trade unions have employment lawyers on retainer that they can wheel in at a moments notice to help you.

    Even if you don't join, you still get the pay rises and conditions that the union negotiates, you just don't get any say in the shapping of them. Other people may make rude comments behind your back if you don't join; you get a lot of the benefits, but you're not paying $5 a week like they are.

    Also as an new immigrant, I think it's good to join organisations, that can widen your social circle, helps integrate

    I think you'd need an overwhelming reason (you're not in the exculsive breathern are you ??) not to join.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Inland Canterbury, NZ
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    Thanks everyone - that's really helpful.

    I have decided to join and am meeting with my Union Delegate next Wednesday

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