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Thread: Seeking advice in moving to NZ from SG

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Singapore
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    2

    Unhappy Seeking advice in moving to NZ from SG

    G'day everyone and I'm rather new to this forum. I managed to find this forum well simply because I have many thoughts running through my head and I just can't fix them. Well straight to the point, I have deep interest in moving to NZ to start my new life as I've gotten myself married about a year ago and was planning to have my kid raise in this beautiful country. I have read quite an amount of information and articles about moving to NZ, skilled migrant visa, silver fern visa etc. however so, I still haven't found a clue that fit myself and my family into?

    A little introduction for myself, I'm a photographer (self-employed) and I hope to continue my passion as well as profession when I moved. My wife and I are running a student care centre in Singapore (of course I only fork out my capital share) and she is fully in charged of the whole operation. We got married slightly more than a year ago and was planning to move to NZ (anywhere in the suburb with a little house). My wife graduated from NUS (National University of Singapore) majored in Social Work (Art & Social Science) while I graduated from Lasalle College of the Art (Singapore). Since both of us are self-employed, may i seek advises from those whom already did moved over? As well as any immigration experts to provide me some more informations before I actually take action.

    I'm cannot be happier to move to a place that I desire but the problem is my wife is quite an obstacle. Reason being she's rather attached to the people here (family and friends). Not that I'm not but I simply felt that we have to pursue the life that we want for we only live once in a lifetime! The story behind my intention to move is too long and crappy perhaps haha hence skip that! I was thinking if there's any sort of "trial visa" where we can experience the living in NZ? More like giving us a try, a chance for my wife to try? What kinda of visa do we need in such case if possible? And in term of employment, what are the advises? Thank you for reading my lengthy posting here but I really appreciate for reading them and suggestions.

    Btw I also came a crossed people saying that we people from SG need not apply for visa? And yet can apply for a job first etc. but only within 3 months. I'm not too sure about that man....
    Last edited by apertuready; 20th March 2014 at 05:23 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    36,603

    Default

    I was thinking if there's any sort of "trial visa" where we can experience the living in NZ?
    The only thing meeting this description would be the WHV, if you meet the terms of the requirements. http://www.immigration.govt.nz/migra...eprogramme.htm
    Btw I also came a crossed people saying that we people from SG need not apply for visa? And yet can apply for a job first etc. but only within 3 months.
    There's nothing that exactly matches this description. It's possible to be in NZ on a visitor's visa, having a look around and trying to find a job, but it's illegal to start work while on a visitor's visa.

    As you're both self-employed, if you hope to run similar businesses in NZ, you need to know you can't do that on a work visa. You would need to have a business visa http://www.immigration.govt.nz/migrant/stream/invest/. As you'll see at that link, the business visa has been being changed, and despite what they say there, full details are not yet available, but if you watch the INZ website, you will know the requirements at the same time as everybody else.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    UK
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    1,547

    Default

    There are a number of possibilities for you and your family - once you have established that you are wanting to do this of course. Firstly, as Singaporean nationals you can travel to NZ as visitors or up to 3 months. However, you cannot work during this time You can if you wish use your time there to explore possibilities of work. This might help you decide if you want to live there and if the reality and your concepts of life in NZ match. You could either focus on one of you getting a skilled job and applying for a work visa - which would allow the other to get a partnership-based work visa to work in any occupation for any employer or even start a business. Alternatively with a job offer you could go straight to residence under SMC. One other pathway might be in relation to setting up a business. The new Entrepreneur Work Visa leading to the Entrepreneur Residence Visa becomes available on 24 March. Here's a link to some more information.http://www.workstudylivenewzealand.c...preneur-visas/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by apertuready View Post
    G'day everyone and I'm rather new to this forum. I managed to find this forum well simply because I have many thoughts running through my head and I just can't fix them. Well straight to the point, I have deep interest in moving to NZ to start my new life as I've gotten myself married about a year ago and was planning to have my kid raise in this beautiful country. I have read quite an amount of information and articles about moving to NZ, skilled migrant visa, silver fern visa etc. however so, I still haven't found a clue that fit myself and my family into?

    A little introduction for myself, I'm a photographer (self-employed) and I hope to continue my passion as well as profession when I moved. My wife and I are running a student care centre in Singapore (of course I only fork out my capital share) and she is fully in charged of the whole operation. We got married slightly more than a year ago and was planning to move to NZ (anywhere in the suburb with a little house). My wife graduated from NUS (National University of Singapore) majored in Social Work (Art & Social Science) while I graduated from Lasalle College of the Art (Singapore). Since both of us are self-employed, may i seek advises from those whom already did moved over? As well as any immigration experts to provide me some more informations before I actually take action.

    I'm cannot be happier to move to a place that I desire but the problem is my wife is quite an obstacle. Reason being she's rather attached to the people here (family and friends). Not that I'm not but I simply felt that we have to pursue the life that we want for we only live once in a lifetime! The story behind my intention to move is too long and crappy perhaps haha hence skip that! I was thinking if there's any sort of "trial visa" where we can experience the living in NZ? More like giving us a try, a chance for my wife to try? What kinda of visa do we need in such case if possible? And in term of employment, what are the advises? Thank you for reading my lengthy posting here but I really appreciate for reading them and suggestions.

    Btw I also came a crossed people saying that we people from SG need not apply for visa? And yet can apply for a job first etc. but only within 3 months. I'm not too sure about that man....



    Hello from Singapore too!
    I could not help much regarding your questions but what I do is that I applied for the WHV, work travel visa to go to NZ.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    new zealand
    Posts
    4

    Default Hygiene standards

    I used to be a big fan of New Zealand and New Zealanders, but in general hygiene
    standards are much lower than they are in Singapore. There is a lot of filth here,
    in public places, on public transport, even on envelopes in a post office. Health standards
    in hospitals are not famous and may be inadequate. I would not recommend New Zealand
    to a Singaporean.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    new zealand
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    4

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    Unlike Singapura, New Zealand is a fourth world country masquerading as a first world country. Many things other countries take for granted simply are not available in New Zealand. Standards of health care, appropriately signposted roads and road works, getting replies to your letters from official organizations, being able to learn a foreign language or more in school. Yours is an old post but some of these would be of concern to a resident from Singapore, particularly the hygiene issue.

    New Zealand, I am afraid, is the answer to no-one's dreams, particularly not the bright and the ambitious. Success tends not to be encouraged - there is a high rate of taxation, unlike in Scandinavia for example, there is not a great deal you get in return. The 'Kiwi mentality' can be characterized as doing things for yourself, nothing wrong with that, except when you intrude into other's space. For example, and this is a small one, I'm looking at an envelope where my name is written again in black marker on it. Now, why on earth? There does not seem to be a mentality here of 'work to do the best you can' (and then it will be rewarded, because it will not), but rather 'work to get through the day' and there are a lot of people in work and often very little for them to do. There seems to be a rather foppish admiration of certain foreigners (almost certainly not Asians I'm afraid), and a lack of realization that these folks, have not, in fact, reached what they have been craving for. Money has never been the answer yet in any society in the world - and New Zealand is in a situation where it is able to realize that, even if it does not.

    I would characterize New Zealand as a country which has grown too quickly from a relatively independent outpost of the British empire to a country where the culture is predominantly over-consumerist and materialistic where it has lost its true values. A country which is lost, not found. I do not believe that I would be alone in such an assessment. That is not to mention the undoubted beauty of the country, but most Kiwis simply do not spend time in it, and if they do they are almost certainly being competitive. There is a very competitive mentality in New Zealand and very little thought, 'competitive against what'? For example, if I was climbing a mountain I would not see it as a 'competition' or an 'attempt to conquer' but enjoy the path and the beauty and the unexpected vistas, much like the poet John Keats recorded 'a strange new planet swimming into his ken, silent upon a peak in Darien.' I would also be safe and take notice of any warnings. Sir Edmund Hillary, a cultural icon, provided an alternative view of climbing a mountain, in terms of respect for native cultures and the environment and people's health and useful education, but his example of a way to greater respect and environmental sustainability tends not to be followed. New Zealanders continue to believe they are 'going it alone', not realizing that they are, in their attempts, being a pastiche of other cultures and have lost others' respect, in not standing up for the traditional values of New Zealand - pride, independence, Maoritanga, respect for nature, self-sufficiency, thrift, helping those who request it, trust, safety and security. So they are creating a chimera for themselves, one that is not sustainable unlike the social system they are rushing to disown.

    On the more positive side, New Zealand is not a sexist society - both men and women seem to be equally discredited. It can be a racist society, particularly against Asians which might be an issue for a couple from Singapore, but not nearly as much as certain other societies, possibly due to a lack of self-esteem. That is about the only benefit I can find from it. People, including children, tend not to be complimented - there is virtually no danger of a big ego for those who stay in New Zealand. Houses and land are relatively cheap compared to other countries characterized as first world. The people are not noted for their sense of humour or their range of emotional expression - I suppose there are advantages to that, although I am unsure what they would be. For those who are not interested in the fruits of the intellect, New Zealand might suit them well - there are very few research programmes, and almost no Ph.D programmes. Outside the big cities you almost certainly will not find programmes of intellectual talks on interesting ideas by well-known or arriviste speakers and opportunities for public speaking - and very possibly not within them, so this would suit people who simply do not want the intellect as a standard or to discuss theories - in some countries such as the Netherlands, you cannot get on a bus reading an intellectual book without someone talking about it with you - in New Zealand there may not even be the bus to get on. Local public transport is rare outside the big cities. Also New Zealanders tend to do well when things are difficult - this is a state of affairs they seem to be rather comfortable with. They may be great people to have around when the disaster is happening - but not when the disaster is over. As well as foreign languages not being taught in schools, nor are useful skills for life and health such as relaxation. In general, I would say 'do not be fooled' by the seemingly easy-going demeanour and reputation of the New Zealander, there are an enormous amount of stressors in New Zealand (see top paragraph) and very few socially acceptable ways in which to respond, hence any responses are likely to be immoderate to the extreme. Other countries simply do not exhibit the level of social interference that seems to be acceptable in New Zealand, at least on the surface, although I would not be surprised if, those who left the country, are, as Vladimir Lenin said, 'voting with their feet', perhaps because it is difficult for them to forge a life in New Zealand the way they would like to live it.

    So to those considering a move to New Zealand, whether from Singapore or elsewhere. My advice to you, as a social analyst, is 'do not' . Do not be fooled by the images that are projected, they are not matched in reality and certainly nature is not protected. To those who are already living here, New Zealand seems to best suit the average or below average, anyone who is interested in the intellect, I would advise you to 'get out' and go to country that is friendlier to this and respects it more. It is not a great place to bring up a bright child and it would be extremely sad if any such child internalized their abilities and talents and blamed themselves due to the overall lack of praise in New Zealand society - which is absolutely nothing to do with the child. *The way the society is, is absolutely not the child's fault*. New Zealand will not change, except to get worse, as it does not appear to be able to attract, and retain, bright and inspirational adults and programmes. There are not the jobs, there are not the research opportunities, there is not the funding, there is not the respect for knowledge (for example of others' customs and what can be usefully learned), most importantly there is not the appreciation and acknowledgement - no bright person will stay without these factors when they may be gained in other societies. Nor, crucially, is there the willingness to acknowledge, and then to move in, new directions that is so necessary for the retention of quality people, whom for example, might want to research in particular ways for success. Edward Rutherford, New Zealand's most famous scientist, became famous outside of New Zealand, he could have not achieved it within the country. I must say, as someone who respects academia, I am shocked at the priorities of the New Zealand governments - retaining a country's bright and attracting others should surely be one of the first priorities of any 'First World' society, and any such failure should be analyzed and put to right. 'Groundhog Day' was only a movie - and not a New Zealand one. It is no use living in the past or in the land of expectations disconnected from the world around it, and New Zealand needs to forge its OWN future and it will be unsuccessful in doing this while following without sense and not learning from other countries' successes - and other countries' mistakes. So much learning and opportunity is present. As a former admirer of New Zealand society and achievements, including in tolerance and indigeneous literature and adventuring around the world, it is tragic to see such potential so repeatedly, and repetitively, lost. I hope my post can go a little way in speculating about the reasons, while saying without a transformation in Weltanschauung, New Zealand will continue to be unwelcoming to those with something worthwhile to contribute to the future, particularly to those who care about the children.
    Last edited by eastofnz; 1st August 2014 at 11:25 PM.

  7. #7
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    Aug 2014
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    Singapore
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    The response of eastofnz is not encouraging at all... Is there anybody who can testify to this declaration?

  8. #8
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    Feb 2008
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    This new poster, eastofnz, has a very individual viewpoint. I don't remember any other posts quite like this on the forum.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Wairarapa NZ
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    36

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    eastofnz....good post, and unfortunately too close to the mark.
    The tall poppy syndrome is all too much alive in NZ, innovation is seldom encouraged.
    Bring plenty of money, you wouldn't want to be poor here.
    Rural NZ can be challenging at times, woefully poor insulation on many homes, losing electricity several times a week when moderately windy due to poorly maintained trees taking down antiquated power lines, ultra slow to no broadband..........I could go on.
    The young and talented have been leaving in their droves, leaving an ever higher percentage of low to average achievers.
    I arrived several years ago, with a young family. I worry about their futures, and expect them to move away when the opportunity arises.
    Despite being poorly ran, and painfully expensive to live in, I still enjoy travelling around, seeing new places and meeting genuine people. But do not take too much notice of the ski/hike/surf/unspoiled beauty image created by the immigration/tourism industry.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    NZ (Auckland; via Canada)
    Posts
    1,337

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    I find NZers keen to perform at a high standard--but they don't blather on about it and don't appreciate those who do too often either. The comments about research programmes are just nonsense: NZ punches well above its weight research-wise.

    Not perfect; not the purgatory described here either.

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