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Thread: New Zealand - an opportunity for a decent living

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Posts
    6

    Red face New Zealand - an opportunity for a decent living

    Greetings!

    I am a 21 year old male from South-East Europe. New Zealand has sparkled genuine interest in my head as far as I know of myself and, while reading many facts about your beautiful country I've definitely fell in love with it! I'm pondering on whether should I eventually move to NZ because, at first sight, it seems like a dream-land to me, many facts considered(oh yes, I got addicted to your breath-taking nature). Coming from a country with 30% and rapidly growing unemployment rate, one of the biggest criminal strongholds and top five corrupt countries in the world, New Zealand really seems like a bliss.
    I am not looking for a utopia, but rather an opportunity for a steady job, a moderate roof over my head, not having to live in fear of tomorrow, so that my life can be something more than a struggle for mere survival.

    There is one thing that really frightens me: I've read something about an uprising of xenophobia in New Zealand, and it has turned me hopeless a little bit. :/ I would be very grateful if you fellow New Zealanders could tell me if that is true. It tickles my mind, if I move over to NZ soon, will I get stared down in the streets, will people call me names and discriminate me at work, if my children will get bullied to hell and back some day. I feel like a stranger in my own degraded country, I wouldn't want to feel like one 18,000 kilometers away all over again, that'd be too expensive.
    Most importantly, let me share a little bit about myself: in two years' time I'll have a level 9 master degree in political/social management and analytics as one of the best in my generation(funny enough, universities in my country are amongst the most prized in Europe, if that's worth anything). I also have a level 4 degree in computers and I wouldn't mind doing any king of job for as long as it takes, I speak English as if it was my native language. I would have no problem integrating myself into a new society, I would look forward to it and it would be a great pleasure to embrace the local culture.

    Seeing as it is too early for me to ask you fellow members for info regarding paperwork, this is a rather philosophical question. I would just like to know if there would be a place for somebody like me in New Zealand, for a moderate living.

    Regarding a practical question: Would a sum of 90,000 NZD mean anything for a roof over my head? Or is it insignificant?

    Thank you in advance for taking time to read this lengthy text!

    PS: I want to thank JandM for helping me through with some difficulties regarding my account registration.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North Canterbury, New Zealand
    Posts
    862

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    NZ is a very inclusive society, there are many immigrants from all over the world here and I would say they are treated with curiosity rather than suspicion; people are interested about where you come from. You should have no trouble if you are prepared to be a little humble and not turn up telling the locals how to run the place (that comes later :-)

    $90k is a good wage, 2-3 times the average.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hawke's Bay -New Zealand
    Posts
    526

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    Well said Mylesdw, I agree.
    Hello Mirco, reading your post made me feel quite sad, I can't begin to know how it must be like to feel an alien in your own country.
    All the best to you in whatever you choose.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    NZ (Auckland; via Canada)
    Posts
    1,321

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    Folks from the Balkans have been settling in NZ for generations. If you speak English well and make an effort to integrate you should be accepted. You will need your degrees from Serbia to be assessed to get the requisite points: no universities in Serbia are exempt from this process.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Belgrade, Serbia
    Posts
    6

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    Thank you for your replies!

    I'm very glad to read this info. I'd have no intention to be bossy at all, would be glad to click in with some normal people there. I tend to mind my own business and make friends while I'm at it.
    @Jawnbc You're right. I'd need to go through the assessment process, no problem with it at all. If I'd move over, I'd finish a few international English language courses on top of what I have, just to be sure.

    All in all, that's the only thing I am interested in, a non-toxic neighbourhood in a non-toxic community.

    PS: The stuff I read on xenophobia is found at some internet websites because I'm doing a thorough research, I apologize if I've offended anyone.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Hawke's Bay -New Zealand
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    526

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    No offence taken, there will always be 'some' people who get xenophobic, like anywhere else, but they are in the minority.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex, UK
    Posts
    2,235

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mirco View Post
    @Jawnbc You're right. I'd need to go through the assessment process, no problem with it at all. If I'd move over, I'd finish a few international English language courses on top of what I have, just to be sure.
    I think you'll be looking at the IELTS exams specifically, that is what immigration is most interested in unless you have done your education in English.

  8. #8
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    Aug 2014
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    Belgrade, Serbia
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    I understand, just like anywhere else, there are always a couple of odd people I suppose. @Drharder I thought of IELTS exactly, just forgot the initials, thanks.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex, UK
    Posts
    2,235

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mirco View Post
    I speak English as if it was my native language.
    Just as some practical advice: the commonly used (i.e. what to put on your CV) highest level of speaking a non native language is 'near-native' or 'full professional proficiency'. Personally, I would not use native (or bilingual) as a non native (or not bilingual) speaker.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Belgrade, Serbia
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    Ah. Just said I speak it as if it was my native language for the sake of introduction, appreciate the advice!

    I've got another practical question: How does a day's life look in terms of earthquakes? I've heard of a couple of devastating earthquakes, that was really sad. But besides that, are earthquakes an every day thing? Does the ground vibrate and shake regularly? Does it get easy to cope with that? Are people's lives at an every day risk? Sorry for being blunt with this topic, it's one of the main things keeping me indecisive, I'm not exactly the bravest kind when it comes to natural mishaps.

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