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Thread: Linked In - are you using it for your job search?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    NZ
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    Default Linked In - are you using it for your job search?

    Hi everyone, just wanted to see who here uses Linked In as part of their job search process??

    In my experience working with new migrants, there are still a good half to a third of my clients who don't have a profile, or who have a profile but don't use it often (eg don't have it populated with info or updated regularly. Linked In has more than 300 million users worldwide and more than 1 million in NZ and recruiters and employers use it frequently to find talent.

    At Auckland Regional Migrant Services, we are holding a Linked In for Job Search workshop for new migrants on August 12 from 10am - 1pm. You can PM me for more information as I can't put my details on here.

    I think I can include a web link to the event, so you can also check out http://www.settlement.org.nz/auckala...ment-workshop/

    We can only take limited numbers because it will be a fairly interactive workshop.

    Also, let me knw your thoughts on Linked In, interested to know

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Auckland
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    3,697

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    I started off with LinkedIn about 10 years back, at that time (and for no. of years since then) it gave enough exposure in finding out old colleagues, search companies and many more of its social advantages, people could join groups & forums for discussions related to fields of expertise (in my case it was telecommunications).

    Years passed by and I didn't bother to update my profile and when I was looking to change jobs, there were few agents & consultants (from NZ) who believed LinkedIn had more accurate information than my CV - soo... I just deleted my profile altogether. There were plenty of recommendations which I had over LinkedIn, I contacted them and kept copy of their recommendations (on emails) for future use. This also keeps a surprise element for the agencies to talk to me first before analyzing my profile.

    This is just my personal experience.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    NZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sun777 View Post
    I started off with LinkedIn about 10 years back, at that time (and for no. of years since then) it gave enough exposure in finding out old colleagues, search companies and many more of its social advantages, people could join groups & forums for discussions related to fields of expertise (in my case it was telecommunications).

    Years passed by and I didn't bother to update my profile and when I was looking to change jobs, there were few agents & consultants (from NZ) who believed LinkedIn had more accurate information than my CV - soo... I just deleted my profile altogether. There were plenty of recommendations which I had over LinkedIn, I contacted them and kept copy of their recommendations (on emails) for future use. This also keeps a surprise element for the agencies to talk to me first before analyzing my profile.

    This is just my personal experience.
    Thanks for your feedback and thoughts. Yes it definitely needs to keep pace with the CV or at least have some of the same consistent information. A lot of employers nowadays will straight away google jobseekers to see what they can find on them before they even meet them in person. Companies like Hays I believe pay a huge sum of money to use it like a giant candidate database, they have access to people who aren't even necessarily looking for work. I suppose it's a good head-hunting tool.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    LinkedIn is a great tool. Sun777, you can set your profile differently for public view. I only include minimal what they need to know but enough to be intriguing. Otherwise, there's just too many noseys, stalkers and random adds!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    LinkedIn is passive networking--unless your experience is in a field/role so in-demand that recruiters are begging for candidates...don't expect a message in your in box inviting you to meet about an amazing job. Many employers are embedding useful info in their corporate LinkedIn spaces--including listing jobs.

    There are perhaps 3 sorts of LinkedIn personal profiles. The Try Too Hard ones have waaaay too much detail, too many "skill" tag and endorsements. The Skeletons show so little info that they are useless. The Useful ones capture the essence of you experience, education and work history, and are consumable.

    Use it, but put your effort into old fashioned networking: getting names of decision-makers in organisations that appeal to you and cold call them.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Parnell, Auckland
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    I use LinkedIn extensively and the biggest issue with LinkedIn is that it is limited by territory. If you are an immigrant or even an aspiring job seeker from say the US, a NZ recruiter will have a hard time searching for your profile if your profile is still set to your home country. They do this because of name commonality as well as to make it so that data presented is useful. And even still, when you search, it will default to links of your links. For another example, you are a recruiter and you have candidate Bob Jones from the UK. You go into LinkedIn and search for Bob Jones but you already have 5 Bob Jones' in your network's network, only those will show. Finding Bob Jones from the UK maybe next to impossible because of name commonality. To get around this, I always include the direct link to my profile in my signature and CV to my LinkedIn Profile.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    India > Auckland
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    LinkedIn is a good tool to know the job market pulse, and you can gauge to a certain extent how in-demand are your skills by Profile Views (from Recruiters or Hiring Managers). I keep my profile 'Public' with just my name and title, and for rest one has to be logged-in to view all details. It is not up-to-date, and maybe gets updated 2-3 times a year. I would say no harm in maintaining a nice, professional profile and not clicking on 'Solve if you are a Genius' type posts.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    New Zealand
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    There is only so much information you can include in your CV. Obviously you want to show people you're qualified for the job and have the right experience, but once you get over 5 pages people just won't read through it all.
    I like to keep my CV brief, but include a link to my LinkedIn profile, and let people know that they can find more information and relevant work examples there. It helps prospective employers find more information if they're interested without bombarding them with too much upfront.

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