Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Bringing household stuffs to New Zealand

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    112

    Default Bringing household stuffs to New Zealand

    Hello,

    We're from a Southest Asia country and we're in the planning phase to move to NZ (my residency just got approved recently). We have been wondering if we should send our household stuffs through a container to New Zealand. (We're not going to buy one full load container, but only a few CBM for our household stuffs.) What we intend to bring is a 8-kg front load washing machine, a big fridge, a Californian King size bed with rubber mattress, 2 medium size chests of drawers, a storage box which can be used as a seat (all are just about more than 1 year old and in good condition with high quality/American standard, especially the furniture) , my kids' toys, kitchen utensils, books and some memory/personal stuffs. We would intend to buy a little more of our daily stuffs (sheet covers, clothes, pillows and cover etc...) to stock up as I understand these are expensive in NZ.

    For those who have moved there, especially from countries like Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand or the Philippines, please help to advise if it's worth the effort (and also the cost) to move those stuffs in, as I was told that brand new whiteware/furniture in New Zealand were expensive (unless it's on sale) but 2nd hand ones were relatively cheap and we could buy 2nd hand to use for those first few years (as we don't want to spend much money on the household stuffs until we have our own house).

    We prefer to use my own stuffs (because of sentimental feelings and familiarization), but if it takes a lot of effort at the custom and cost (around more or less 130usd/cbm for the freight only), we might have to consider.

    If we don't move these things and choose to buy the secondhand ones (unless we wait for sales when we move there), we might end up using the less quality things while those of ours in the home country will be sold at a very cheap price or just given away.

    I would appreciate very much your advice (especially from those who have successfully moved there, with or without your household shipment). What would you recommend ?

    Thanks
    Last edited by KandT; 8th April 2016 at 01:58 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North Canterbury, New Zealand
    Posts
    863

    Default

    It's been discussed a few times before, but generally - bring your own stuff. Things tend to be expensive and poor quality here and wages once you arrive are low so buying new might be harder than you think. Moving goods by sea, per cubic metre is really very cheap by comparison; a cubic metre is a very big box. All the small items you mention will easily go in 1 cbm. The bigger items such as furniture can be filled with the smaller items so really very economical to ship rather than replace, quite apart from the sentimental value of having your own things when you arrive.

    The only thing worth checking are the electrical items - are they the same voltage and frequency as NZ? If not, people do use converters (particularly those moving from the USA) but that is another complication and expense. If they are the same, then worth bringing; contrary to what you have been told the second-hand market is not cheap and the quality tends to be poor. A decent new front loading washing machine will set you back well over $1000 and a big fridge can be over $3000.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California to Tasman Bay
    Posts
    1,136

    Default

    It obviously depends on your own situation and location but I found that there wasn't much savings in getting a partial or shared container compared to getting a 20'. When I did the comparison of how much it would cost to replace all of my furniture new, it was much less than the cost of shipping a 20' container.

    As to second hand, I think it really depends on where you live. The variety and price of second hand goods is okay in Wellington and Auckland but not very good everywhere else. The problem with NZ is that there isn't much middle quality/price. There is either good quality at very high prices or low quality at okay prices. I'm not sure about the cost of things in Southeast Asia but I've found that second hand goods in NZ often sell for more than what they would be new where I'm from. It's worth researching this comparison for your own region before making your decision.

    We had a lot of Ikea kids furniture that we brought with us and when the kids outgrew it, we sold it on Trademe and got more for it than we actually paid new.

    In my experience, if you can afford to ship as much as you can/want/need, you'll save money in the long run.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    112

    Default

    Thanks a lot Myles. Yes, I've been digging the old threads and it seems people from the UK and US tend to ship their things to NZ as I understand things with good quality are cheaper in the US (while I'm not very sure about experience of people from the Southeast Asia areas). Anyway, it's very helpful to have a different view about 2nd hand market in NZ.

    Surely we will have to check on the voltage for electrical items. We're using 220V in our home country, compared with NZ electric current of 220-240V, so do you think that would be a problem of slightly higher voltage ? (Eg: Will things have shorter lives/easily burn out due to this slightly high voltage?) Moreover, I just wonder if it's a good idea to move the fridge as someone told me that it would be easily damaged (because of the inside gas) which I have no knowledge about.

    Thanks again.



    Quote Originally Posted by mylesdw View Post
    It's been discussed a few times before, but generally - bring your own stuff. Things tend to be expensive and poor quality here and wages once you arrive are low so buying new might be harder than you think. Moving goods by sea, per cubic metre is really very cheap by comparison; a cubic metre is a very big box. All the small items you mention will easily go in 1 cbm. The bigger items such as furniture can be filled with the smaller items so really very economical to ship rather than replace, quite apart from the sentimental value of having your own things when you arrive.

    The only thing worth checking are the electrical items - are they the same voltage and frequency as NZ? If not, people do use converters (particularly those moving from the USA) but that is another complication and expense. If they are the same, then worth bringing; contrary to what you have been told the second-hand market is not cheap and the quality tends to be poor. A decent new front loading washing machine will set you back well over $1000 and a big fridge can be over $3000.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    112

    Default

    Thanks Kiwieagle for your insights. Would you reckon that

    When I did the comparison of how much it would cost to replace all of my furniture new, it was much less than the cost of shipping a 20' container.
    So it means that it's cheaper buying new there than the cost of shipping a 20' container? Or did you really mean the cost is higher buying new?

    I've just searched and known that a 20' container can fit up to 33 CBM, which is a lot (I will have hard time finding things to fill in though if I can get a 20' :-)). My things are just about more or less 5 CBMs at most (since I can fill big ones with small items as Myles advised). And I guess, per CBM cost would be cheaper if you take full load container (FLC).

    My problem is that we haven't known the house/apartment that we will rent yet. Also, the moving cost in NZ would be another problem that I need to consider (since we don't know if we can settle in one place during the first year).

    By the way, compared with those of good quality in the US, things of good quality in my home country is expensive, so we have to be selective on things we ship (because not all of our household stuffs are with high quality except for those mentioned).

    Thanks







    Quote Originally Posted by kiwieagle View Post
    It obviously depends on your own situation and location but I found that there wasn't much savings in getting a partial or shared container compared to getting a 20'. When I did the comparison of how much it would cost to replace all of my furniture new, it was much less than the cost of shipping a 20' container.

    As to second hand, I think it really depends on where you live. The variety and price of second hand goods is okay in Wellington and Auckland but not very good everywhere else. The problem with NZ is that there isn't much middle quality/price. There is either good quality at very high prices or low quality at okay prices. I'm not sure about the cost of things in Southeast Asia but I've found that second hand goods in NZ often sell for more than what they would be new where I'm from. It's worth researching this comparison for your own region before making your decision.

    We had a lot of Ikea kids furniture that we brought with us and when the kids outgrew it, we sold it on Trademe and got more for it than we actually paid new.

    In my experience, if you can afford to ship as much as you can/want/need, you'll save money in the long run.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California to Tasman Bay
    Posts
    1,136

    Default

    Oh, sorry. Bad editing on my part. You are right, I meant it was cheaper to ship everything in a 20' container than to re-buy it new.

    It was only about $500 less to get a partial container but that probably varies depending on company and location. I packed, cleaned, and catalogued our possessions myself. My husband and I loaded the container ourselves. That saved us a bit of money because we only paid for the rental and shipping of the container. Our container was not full. I even put extra toiletries, shampoo, soap, and other things that cost so much more here. I wish I brought more.

    We put our stuff in a storage unit for about a month when it arrived after 2 months at sea. It was less than $100. Since our belongings arrived after we did, I had time to compare prices.

    We hired a big truck and moved our stuff ourselves.

    So, there are definitely less expensive alternatives out there. It varies, but for my family, because we were always going to ship some personal items, it made sense to ship it all and not have to re-buy things (except electrical devices). Those first few months here were financially tight, so not having to re-buy a lot of things helped us.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    S'pore-2-AKL again
    Posts
    877

    Default

    I can simply say that most of the appliances you have listed above makes practical sense to bring to NZ as they are more often more expensive in NZ than in Singapore. It's actually quite wasteful to throw them away as there is virtually no 2nd hand market in Singapore whereas in NZ, 2nd hand items can still fetch quite a decent price even if you decide to later forgo it.

    However do note that it takes about 3 weeks to seafreight to NZ, so you need to ship far in advance before you fly off or do without them for a short while in NZ. Usually you would stay in a service apartment for a few weeks until you find a suitable rental as it takes a little time to search around and move in. Most rentals in NZ are unfurnished so yes you would need to either buy or bring your furniture and appliances in.

    Most appliances in Singapore are between 220-240V so they are compatible to NZ's 240V. However NZ has the kangaroo 3-pin or 2 pin plug so you would need to get adapters to have them suited. You can buy such adapters quite cheaply in electronic stores and Mustafa does sell them for less than $2 each.

    I would shop around for a moving firm and get several quotations. It doesn't cost that much to ship several items even if you don't have a full container worth of stuff. Personally I would prefer a moving company that does a wrapping service, boxes and crates my items together. This means the items are in their own crate and helps to prevent damage as well as theft.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    112

    Default

    Wow, you were really great, DIY for the move. I was checking the LTC shipment and it seems very expensive (compared to the cost I originally knew). Maybe we have to think whether there's any alternative/options. May I know when did you move, as it seems the cost of your container shipping is good? Thanks


    Quote Originally Posted by kiwieagle View Post
    Oh, sorry. Bad editing on my part. You are right, I meant it was cheaper to ship everything in a 20' container than to re-buy it new.

    It was only about $500 less to get a partial container but that probably varies depending on company and location. I packed, cleaned, and catalogued our possessions myself. My husband and I loaded the container ourselves. That saved us a bit of money because we only paid for the rental and shipping of the container. Our container was not full. I even put extra toiletries, shampoo, soap, and other things that cost so much more here. I wish I brought more.

    We put our stuff in a storage unit for about a month when it arrived after 2 months at sea. It was less than $100. Since our belongings arrived after we did, I had time to compare prices.

    We hired a big truck and moved our stuff ourselves.

    So, there are definitely less expensive alternatives out there. It varies, but for my family, because we were always going to ship some personal items, it made sense to ship it all and not have to re-buy things (except electrical devices). Those first few months here were financially tight, so not having to re-buy a lot of things helped us.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    112

    Default

    Thanks batgirl1001. Am aware of the 3-pin plug and intends to stock a bit of it (it was so expensive in NZ last time, compared to our home country).
    I'm just trying to get some different quotations and it seems it's more expensive than what we expected. We will have to figure a way to keep the cost to the minimum.
    Thanks very much for your advice and note.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    S'pore-2-AKL again
    Posts
    877

    Default

    I have no clue exactly what you term as expensive because in the end it is relative. Bringing some appliances and large items will add to the cost, no matter what. However I tend to value capability, good service and reliability rather than cost. In the end, you truly get what you paid for. To illustrate, when I moved back to Singapore, I engaged a fantastic mover in NZ which cost me a bundle over $5300 for 7 cbms. However everything was crated, boxed and itemized and nothing was damaged or stolen. I didn't even got insurance.

    When I first moved to NZ I engaged what I thought was a good and competitive. Send over 3.5cbms of stuff and it was about $1600. The items were all wrapped together in plastic sheets on a crate only. The mover shipped it to Dunedin instead of Auckland as instructed. The items were taken apart and brought to Auckland in 2 shipments by land. When it was delivered to our address, we found several things were broken (not a big deal) and our PC computer was skeletonized. Meaning everything inside the computer was taken, - we lost lots of datas including personal videos and photos. We had insurance for damaged or lost/stolen items but it didn't make a difference because the Singapore company in our claim didn't want to process it. They insist it was the fault of the NZ movers. The NZ movers themselves all denied it and claimed it was the Singapore movers who stole the items. So back-and-forth and of course the police is no help in this.

    So I think yes if you are shipping expensive appliances or goods, and you want cheap, I am afraid you might get what you paid for.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •