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Thread: How rural is rural

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Nederland
    Posts
    4

    Default How rural is rural

    Hi there!

    We have started the proces of getting a entrepeneur work visa to move to NZ. Dreaming way ahead of time, we are wondering where to live. For us the 'where'-question might me a little bit different dan usual.

    It will be the north island for sure, but we intend to live in a rural setting. Wanting to buy of build a nice farm house, having some small live stock. We are used to living like that now in the Netherlands, however as our backyard is rural (looking out for miles), our front yard touches the edge of a town, so by a 10 minute walk we are in the centre of the town with basic shops, a gp etc. Idealy we would like something like this in New Zealand. However, from the extend we've been browsing google maps and streetview is seems that because of the specious layout, this might not be possible. Therefor I've two questions:

    1. Is my assumption correct? Or do you have any suggestions for me to look?

    2. Does any one have experience living more rural. For us it's important not to be isolated and having people nearby.

    Looking forward!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    UK > Silverwood, Whitby, NZ
    Posts
    288

    Default

    Look at Pauatahanui, about 30km north of Wellington. Close to Whitby village centre (supermarket, GP, pub, etc) less than 10 mins in car. Porirua city centre 20 mins in car. Pauatahanui village has a coupe of cafes, a cute cinema, a trading post for rural supplies - ie livestock feed. The new transmission gulley lroad is due for completion by 2020, and there will be a link road connecting Pauatahanui.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Yes Pauatahanui is nice. Perhaps look at Greytown in the Wairarapa or Cambridge near Hamilton? Or if you want to live near the sea, some town in the Coromandel or Raglan on the west coast? All nice places.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    59

    Default

    We are living rural at moment in hawkes bay , we have a 20 min drive to nearest town and we enjoy it big time. Half our from pacific ocean etc. We also lived in the netherlands before we came to nz and we love it overhere

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Nederland
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Hi Libby!

    Which town do you live in? How long have you been living in NZ?

    :-)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    815

    Default

    Wow, sounds like a rare sweet spot you live in right now - usually you have to choose between walkability and sweeping views! I'm not in NZ yet, so following this thread with interest. It was my understanding that plots in NZ tend to be either quite small (town, like 1/4 acre or something?) or quite large ("lifestyle," e.g. many acres for livestock and such). I could be wrong, though.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North Canterbury, New Zealand
    Posts
    862

    Default

    Originally urban sections were all 1/4 acre but the trend has been for much smaller than that. Many of the 1/4 acre sections have been subdivided into 2,3 or 4. There is something of a fashion for houses that need pretty much no maintenance at all, so the house occupies the whole section with little more than a path and a deck on the outside; no lawn and no garden. Not to my taste but popular amongst those with active pursuits who do not want to do anything around the house evenings and weekends.

    In answer to the OP there should be plenty of sections that fulfil your needs; there certainly are around North Canterbury so I'm sure the North Island won't be much different. Rural sections around here are typically 10 acres but you can find both bigger and smaller if you shop around.
    Last edited by mylesdw; 13th March 2017 at 08:57 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    815

    Default

    Some of the nice places we've looked up have tiny lots (about house sized) but back up to rolling hills with no end in sight. Of course, there would be no guarantee that you wouldn't get boxed in later if the land was developed later :-(

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    75

    Default

    How much do you have to spend? Yes, you can find semi-rural lifestyle blocks. You might try looking at the NZ Lifestyle block website (Google will find the URL) and asking on the forum there.
    Why limit yourself to North Island? I found a lovely 3400 sq m property in a small town outside of Blenheim...40 established fruit trees, room for a few animals, good internet, vineyards all around...house has character but needs work....$315k.
    Btw, if you've doing entrepreneur stuff, you may need to check carefully for internet connectivity. Mountains can make WiFi difficult, and not everywhere has good wired connections.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Based on my experience looking for properties similar to what you describe

    ... you're basically correct. You're not going to find European type villages in NZ. The settlement pattern in NZ is much more dispersed, and in town that are thriving, the trend is to subdivide what were originally quarter acre sections, resulting in increasingly fewer lots over 1000 sq m and many much smaller. If you go to a place where population isn't growing, or is declining, you'll find residences in town or within walking distance, that have 2000 m2 to a hectare or two because infill isn't happening, and the old timers liked to keep a few livestock and have a bit of orchard and veggie garden. You CAN find such larger sections in thriving areas, but they are few and far between, and the prices reflect the land value if subdivided...ie., typically well over $1M.
    Most places sold as lifestyle properties are at least a few km from town, often 10s of km out.
    You will also find that old time houses are poorly insulated and often rely on wood heat. Kiwis tend to be cold hardy.
    I spent a lot of time looking and ended up in a 100 yr old house in town on an unusually large lot. This winter I've been COLD. Look forward to building a new place with sub-floor heating, passive solar orientation, and double pane windows.
    Last edited by sandgrubber; 5th August 2017 at 01:17 PM. Reason: Further thoughts

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