Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Is it worth buying more things prior to shipping?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    5

    Default Is it worth buying more things prior to shipping?

    Hi Everyone! I was hoping to get some advice, and I don't think this hasn't been asked before.

    We are moving to New Zealand for a job and the company is actually paying for the shipping, but they outright said no to using relocation funds to purchase new furniture in New Zealand instead.

    After some research, I see the consensus is to 'ship everything you would take if you moved inland'. The catch is that most of the things we have are actually not something we want to keep. We were planning to replace furniture, clothes, bikes, a lot of household items after we move (we knew we'd be moving soon). The only things we are attached would be the book collection and a baby crib (only piece of furniture younger than a decade).

    So in light of so many horror stories of how the prices in New Zealand are beyond exorbitant, would it make sense to buy furniture and/or other items to ship?

    Side note: I read somewhere that Ziploc bags can be hard to find? If we also ship non food disposable items (cling wrap, diapers..) would customs raise an eyebrow? Cause we do not want to annoy the guys at the border! That never ends well...

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Christchurch
    Posts
    384

    Default

    If someone else is covering the shipping, I'd say go for it. Not only will essentially everything be much less expensive in the US, the selection will be much better. Do keep in mind that bed sizes are different here so if you're going to buy a bed, get the mattress, as well (and the sheets).

    Customs will not be concerned at all with your non-food disposables. We, by the way, bring back Ziploc bags by the hundreds every time we make a trip to the US.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Scotland to Wellington
    Posts
    1,454

    Default

    Absolutely. If you have relocation expenses paying for shipping, then it makes sense to bring stuff. It would only not make sense if things were cheaper in NZ...
    On a side note, one of NZ's great exports other than dairy products is the plastic lunchbox range made by sistema http://sistemaplastics.com to avoid buying disposable stuff.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    UK->CA->NZ
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Better check out prices from big retailers such as Warehouse, Noel Leeming, Harvey Norman and Farmers to have a feel on how much things are cost here. We just bought a Dyson AM09 hot+cool heater, even with a 20 discount at Farmers, it ended up around the same price I would have paid in Best Buy Canada. I also like to use Body Shops products but seem to cost double when compared to Canada. On the other hand, I noticed in the neighbourhood I am living (Ponsonby in Auckland), people like to give away stuff for free and they post in the local social media site https://www.neighbourly.co.nz . I was very surprised people give away beds, mattress, sofa, bikes etc. I guess maybe because it costs to dispose them so people would rather give it away for free.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thank you very much for your replies!

    I did figure that some items are really worth buying before the move, just wasn't sure which ones. I figured electrical ones (kettle, toasters) are move convenient to replace there due to voltage difference. And sounds like tupper-ware come in a good local selection!

    Good to know about the beds. That's one furniture piece we'll likely want to buy in New Zealand anyway, since we'll need it as soon as we get there and shipping can take a while. But we'll look pretty silly if we arrive with a life time supply of bed sheets that don't fit :-)

    I did do some research on prices, but I quickly discovered that I am clueless when it comes to assessing quality of furniture. And online, I can't even tell the difference between a regular and an inflatable couch. Well, we still have a couple of months to ponder.

    And if anyone stumbles on this thread who had a hard time with finding everyday items please share! (I got the Ziplocs covered now!)
    Last edited by EnRoute; 20th April 2017 at 01:10 PM. Reason: To avoid double posting

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    35,964

    Default

    Talking about beds and bedding, here is an old post that has actual measurements, and what the different sizes are called in NZ (and the UK, though I know that's not relevant to you). https://www.enz.org/forum/showthread...934#post283934

    By the way, notice the NZ customs' attitude to your imported personal household goods. http://www.customs.govt.nz/features/...s/default.aspx

    Duty-free entry for household items

    ​When entering New Zealand either as a returning citizen or resident, or if settling for the first time, your household or other related effects will be admitted free of Customs duty and goods and services tax (GST) for a reasonable time after you arrive, provided you can meet the following requirements:

    You have arrived in New Zealand and, on the date the effects are imported, hold a document authorising residence in New Zealand.
    For the whole of the period of 21 months preceding your arrival, you have lived outside New Zealand (brief holiday or exploratory visits do not exclude a person from qualifying for this concession).
    You have owned and used the goods before the date of your arrival in New Zealand.
    The goods are for your own personal use and are not intended for any other person or persons, or for gift, sale, or exchange.

    Exceptions

    The following goods will not qualify for duty-free entry, unless you can establish that they were for your own personal use prior to their arrival in New Zealand:

    Any goods shipped directly after purchase to avoid local taxes in the country of export.
    Replacement electrical equipment operating to New Zealand standards.
    Goods of a commercial nature (such as factory plant and office equipment).

    In these cases you may need to pay Customs duty and any other applicable charges.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Scotland to Wellington
    Posts
    1,454

    Default

    I must be missing something because I've never bought a ziploc bag in my life

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    UK->CA->NZ
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Our queen sized sheets from Canada fit the queen sized bed in NZ. The fitted sheet and the pillow cases are a bit tight but still OK. For electrical stuff, we were very surprised that our Sony Bravia TV (despite the sticker on the back of the TV stated for 110v only) worked in NZ! However, some stuff is definitely hard to find. We can't find retainer cleanser for our mouth guard. When we asked the pharmacy, they never heard of that kind of thing, they only have denture cleanser. Also, I can't find unbleached flour in Countdown (maybe flour in NZ is unbleached?). We did upgrade all our electronics before moving. Finally, can't find root beer here. I have a pulled pork recipe which uses root beer! On the other hand, we have been here only a few months so take time to find stuff :-)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California to Tasman Bay
    Posts
    1,135

    Default

    Hi,

    If someone else is paying shipping, bring it all. Bring the stuff you don't want. Bring the bed you are planning on replacing. Buy a new bed in the USA and bring that. Buy sheets and bring those. Whatever you are thinking about replacing, buy it in USA and ship it. Take it out of its wrapper and use it a bit so it doesn't all look brand new, but for pete's sake, don't buy it here. Buy TP, buy soap, buy make up, buy shampoo, buy wine, buy tequila. Bring your old ladder. Bring your plastic storage drawers. Bring it all. Ziploc bags are readily available but if you go to Costco, why not? They'll be cheaper.

    Quality here goes in this order:
    super good=expensive
    cheap as=only slightly less expensive
    will last 2-4 weeks=affordable
    Obviously, there are exceptions. Electronics are relatively well priced but often it's last year's model.

    Some people say don't do this because you have to get used to the price of things here anyway. It is true. But why not ease into it? I say get used to the cost of lamb, bread, and hand mixers whilst not worrying about shampoo, conditioner, and ladders.

    I sold my children's used Ikea toddler furniture on TradeMe for more than I paid for it in the USA.

    Here are the exceptions: Anything with a plug that doesn't have 240v, 60hz (kitchen appliances, old radios). Any broken furniture. Anything that you can't be sure doesn't have bugs and spiders living in it.

    Obviously your mileage may vary, but as someone who often kicks myself because I don't have that really high quality thing I need that I thought I would just replace here, this is my advice.

    Cheers, Sarah
    Last edited by kiwieagle; 23rd April 2017 at 04:56 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California to Tasman Bay
    Posts
    1,135

    Default

    Finally, can't find root beer here. I have a pulled pork recipe which uses root beer! On the other hand, we have been here only a few months so take time to find stuff
    Golden Circle makes a "Sarsparilla" that tastes remarkably close to root beer. Bundaberg also makes a "Sarsparilla" that is not. I've seen A&W in some supermarkets.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •