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Thread: Abnormal blood test result

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    New Zealand
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    15

    Question Abnormal blood test result

    I got my blood test results back today and it stated there was a finding of "mild neutropenia" which means I have a low level of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell). I have already scheduled a follow-up blood test next week and I'm hoping it will go back to a normal level, but worried about what to do if it doesn't. The doctor stated "This is quite common and is usually nothing to worry about. The level goes up and down from day to day, often for no known reason." However, I have a friend who had pretty major problems getting a visa because his blood test results kept coming back "inconclusive" so I'm a bit on edge about this.

    I'm 29 years old, healthy, and very rarely sick. Has anyone else had a similar experience or know what the next steps might be if the next blood test comes back with similarly low levels? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    36,004

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    What happens if a bloodtest is abnormal is that you submit the medical anyway. Medicals are scanned automatically by computer, and if an abnormality is mentioned (or, we think, certain key words, but that isn't publicly stated), a medical is referred to a Medical Assessor (MA), whose job it is to understand the applicant's state of health, and if likely care and treatment will be too expensive for the NZ Health Service. The INZ CO cannot finish processing the case without hearing from the MA that the applicant has an Acceptable State of Health (ASH).

    Sometimes, the computer has picked up a tiny abnormality which is insignificant (because it can't make a judgement), in which case the MA can give ASH straight away. However, if there is something more, the MA has the power to send a message (which will be passed on by the CO) telling the applicant to provide (whatever) doctor's or consultant's report, and/or (whatever) further test results, to allow him/her to understand what is going on. So for your case, if there is still an abnormal reading at the next test, you can ask your doctor to write a letter stating that he has examined you and there is nothing seriously wrong with you (or whatever he actually finds). If he DID find some condition, he would need to say exactly what, the treatment prescribed, and the prognosis. Then you send that letter to INZ with your eMedical number and all the details of your case, where and when lodged, etc..

    Cases referred to the MAs have to wait in a date-order queue to have attention. The doctor's letter would catch up with your medical while it's waiting. Then, when the MA first looks at your medical, with luck, the answer to what s/he would have required will already be there to be seen.

    A case like you mention is quite rare. Someone's own doctor, if they aren't sure what is causing a certain reading, will normally refer them to a consultant, who can say whether this (whatever it is) is likely or not to be due to anything requiring prolonged and costly treatment, and that's what the MAs need to know. The MAs can require further opinions if the first report doesn't make it clear.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    15

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    Quote Originally Posted by JandM View Post
    What happens if a bloodtest is abnormal is that you submit the medical anyway. Medicals are scanned automatically by computer, and if an abnormality is mentioned (or, we think, certain key words, but that isn't publicly stated), a medical is referred to a Medical Assessor (MA), whose job it is to understand the applicant's state of health, and if likely care and treatment will be too expensive for the NZ Health Service. The INZ CO cannot finish processing the case without hearing from the MA that the applicant has an Acceptable State of Health (ASH).

    Sometimes, the computer has picked up a tiny abnormality which is insignificant (because it can't make a judgement), in which case the MA can give ASH straight away. However, if there is something more, the MA has the power to send a message (which will be passed on by the CO) telling the applicant to provide (whatever) doctor's or consultant's report, and/or (whatever) further test results, to allow him/her to understand what is going on. So for your case, if there is still an abnormal reading at the next test, you can ask your doctor to write a letter stating that he has examined you and there is nothing seriously wrong with you (or whatever he actually finds). If he DID find some condition, he would need to say exactly what, the treatment prescribed, and the prognosis. Then you send that letter to INZ with your eMedical number and all the details of your case, where and when lodged, etc..

    Cases referred to the MAs have to wait in a date-order queue to have attention. The doctor's letter would catch up with your medical while it's waiting. Then, when the MA first looks at your medical, with luck, the answer to what s/he would have required will already be there to be seen.

    A case like you mention is quite rare. Someone's own doctor, if they aren't sure what is causing a certain reading, will normally refer them to a consultant, who can say whether this (whatever it is) is likely or not to be due to anything requiring prolonged and costly treatment, and that's what the MAs need to know. The MAs can require further opinions if the first report doesn't make it clear.
    Thanks so much for this. If my 2nd blood test comes back abnormal then I'll see what further tests I can do to hopefully preempt any MA questions. I'm not applying for my visa for another 3 weeks so I hope to get it all taken care of before I submit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    6

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    Quote Originally Posted by LParsons1 View Post
    Thanks so much for this. If my 2nd blood test comes back abnormal then I'll see what further tests I can do to hopefully preempt any MA questions. I'm not applying for my visa for another 3 weeks so I hope to get it all taken care of before I submit.
    Was your case referred to a MA?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    15

    Default

    No it was not referred to an MA. My 2nd blood test came back normal. My visa ended up being approved very quickly, a little over a week if I recall correctly.

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