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Thread: Is diabetes an issue?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
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    Auckland
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    70

    Default Is diabetes an issue?

    Hi, when my partner did his medical, it was found that he had diabetes. Since he never knew about it then it W on the higher end. His HbA1c was 14 at that time. And then after medication and diet, a test was recommended by Immigration and was found to be 10.8. Recently another test to be done was asked by immigration and it was 10.2. But all his other organs are working fine and have come with good reports. But this medical was not assessed as his visa was rejected due to other reasons. And was advised that he will have to submit a new medical if it's after 3 months. In general, is Diabetes an issue for immigration even if the organs are fine?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    37,449

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    No, it's not a problem. (Here https://www.immigration.govt.nz/opsmanual/#46506.htm is the full range of conditions which can cause a difficulty - I've linked to the page about residence, because that is what you will want for your husband eventually.)

    Diabetes is among many conditions which can be controlled with regular medication. The INZ MA will be looking to see that your husband's doctor has been monitoring him and found an appropriate regime to maintain him in good health.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Auckland
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    70

    Default

    Thanks JandM. Gives me much relief knowing that. Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    NZ
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JandM View Post
    No, it's not a problem. (Here https://www.immigration.govt.nz/opsmanual/#46506.htm is the full range of conditions which can cause a difficulty - I've linked to the page about residence, because that is what you will want for your husband eventually.)

    Diabetes is among many conditions which can be controlled with regular medication. The INZ MA will be looking to see that your husband's doctor has been monitoring him and found an appropriate regime to maintain him in good health.
    Hi JandM

    There's another clause in the OPs manual A4.10.2(c)

    https://www.immigration.govt.nz/opsmanual/#46506.htm

    In the case of chronic recurring medical conditions, the medical assessor will provide an opinion on whether, over the predicted course of the condition or group of conditions, there is a relatively high probability that the condition or group of conditions will require health services costing in excess of NZ$41,000.

    Are hypertension and diabetes considered chronic recurring conditions by INZ ( as in medical terms they are chronic if they are long term) and are they assessed by considering the clause mentioned above ( although they are not explicitly mentioned under conditions in A4.10.1 ) ? I can understand that when clause says "high probability" MO must be checking other factors like diabetes complications or cardio risk factor or cardio history. also this clause doesnt consider the cost for 5 years ( there is no time limit mentioned)


    If we see section A4.10.2

    Clause A mentions about high probability of conditions to cause cost of NZD 41,000 without any time limit or type of conditions ( acute/chronic) .

    Clause B mentions specifically about "acute medical condition" and talks if conditions costing in excess of NZ$41,000 within a period of FIVE YEARS

    Clause C mentions specifically about "chronic medical condition" and talks if conditions costing in excess of NZ$41,000 and no mention of any time limit WHICH IS SCARY as may be diabetes can cause something after 10 years
    Last edited by nzresident; 2nd January 2020 at 05:37 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    37,449

    Default

    We have never seen on the threads anyone with "normal" diabetes or hypertension (without complications or flare-ups requiring extra intervention) - that is, someone whose condition has been diagnosed some time before and whose regular treatment is controlling it so they live a normal life - being refused entry.

    If a Medical is referred, the MA's responsibility is to look over it and understand the applicant's condition as far as possible. The history given MAY be enough, or they have the power to require a report from the person's own doctor or a specialist, or more tests if appropriate, so that they reach a satisfactory understanding and can make an educated guess about the person's future health (and therefore, costs). For the conditions you are asking about, widespread and commonly treated with known medication, usually the most that is required is that their regular doctor says they are doing well on their current regime.

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